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Attack in Kabul kills 18; al-Qaida leader killed in Ghazni

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An Afghan receives treatment at hospital after suicide attack in Kabul, Afghanistan, Saturday, Oct. 24, 2020. The death toll from the suicide attack Saturday in Afghanistan’s capital has risen that includes schoolchildren, the interior ministry said..

AP

The death toll from the suicide attack Saturday in Afghanistan’s capital has risen to at least 18 killed and 57 people wounded, including students, the interior ministry said.

Afghan security officials separately announced on Saturday that a senior al-Qaida commander had been killed in a recent operation in the country’s east.

Saturday’s explosion in the capital struck outside an education center in a heavily Shiite neighborhood of western Kabul, Dasht-e-Barchi.

Interior Ministry spokesman Tariq Arian says that the attacker was trying to enter the center when he was stopped by security guards.

According to Arian, the casualty toll may rise further as family members of victims of the suicide

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Big suicide bombing in Kabul kills 18 at education center

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The death toll from the suicide attack Saturday in Afghanistan’s capital has risen to at least 18 killed and 57 people wounded, including students, the interior ministry said.

The explosion struck outside an education center in a heavily Shiite neighborhood of western Kabul, Dasht-e-Barchi.

Interior Ministry spokesman Tariq Arian says that the attacker was trying to enter the center when he was stopped by security guards.

According to Arian, the casualty toll may rise further as family members of victims of the suicide bombing are still searching the several different hospitals where the wounded have been taken.


No group claimed immediate responsibility for the bombing. The Taliban rejected any connection with the attack.

An Islamic State affiliate claimed responsibility for a similar suicide attack at an education center in August 2018, in which 34 students were killed. Within Afghanistan, IS has launched large-scale attacks on minority

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Big suicide bombing in Afghanistan kills 18 at education center

By TAMEEM AKHGAR

KABUL, Afghanistan — The death toll from the suicide attack Saturday in Afghanistan’s capital has risen to at least 18 killed and 57 people wounded, including students, the interior ministry said.

The explosion struck outside an education center in a heavily Shiite neighborhood of western Kabul, Dasht-e-Barchi.

Interior Ministry spokesman Tariq Arian says that the attacker was trying to enter the center when he was stopped by security guards.

According to Arian, the casualty toll may rise further as family members of victims of the suicide bombing are still searching the several different hospitals where the wounded have been taken.

No group claimed immediate responsibility for the bombing. The Taliban rejected any connection with the attack.

An Islamic State affiliate claimed responsibility for a similar suicide attack at an education center in August 2018, in which 34 students were killed. Within Afghanistan, IS has launched large-scale attacks

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Suicide bombing at Kabul education centre kills 18

By Abdul Qadir Sediqi and Orooj Hakimi

KABUL (Reuters) – A suicide bombing at an education centre in Afghanistan’s capital Kabul killed at least 18 people and wounded dozens more on Saturday, officials said.

A Ministry of Interior spokesman, Tariq Arian, cited security guards as identifying a bomber who detonated explosives in the street outside the Kawsar-e Danish educational centre.

Eighteen people were killed and 57 were injured in the attack, according to the interior ministry.

Islamic State claimed responsibility for the bombing, the group said in a statement on Telegram, without providing evidence.

A Taliban spokesman on Twitter denied responsibility for the attack, which comes at a sensitive time as teams representing the insurgents and the government meet in Qatar to seek a peace deal.

The attack took place in an area of west Kabul that is home to many from the country’s Shia community, a religious minority in

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18 killed in IS attack at Afghan education centre

A suicide bomber struck near an education centre in the Afghan capital Kabul on Saturday, killing at least 18 people in an attack claimed by the extremist Islamic State that rocked the conflict-wracked country.

Violence on the ground has spiked in recent weeks despite the Taliban and the Afghan government holding peace talks in Qatar to end the country’s grinding war.

The suicide attack, which also left 57 wounded, happened in the late afternoon at the centre in a western district of Kabul, which offers training and higher education courses.

“A suicide bomber wanted to enter the education centre,” interior ministry spokesman Tareq Arian said in a statement.

“But he was identified by the centre’s guards, after which he detonated his explosives in an alley.”

He confirmed the attack had killed 18 people and wounded 57.

The extremist Islamic State group subsequently claimed responsibility for the attack.

A suicide bomber

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Afghan bombing: Kabul education centre attack kills at least 18

Image caption

The education centre attacked on Saturday usually hosts hundreds of students

At least 18 people have been killed and 57 wounded in a suicide bomb attack outside an education centre in the Afghan capital, Kabul, officials say.

The explosion at the private facility, which offers courses for students in higher education, occurred late in the afternoon, the interior ministry said.

The building in the predominantly Shia Muslim Dasht-e-Barchi area usually hosts hundreds of students.

Many have been taken to hospital. There are fears the death toll may rise.

The Islamic State group said it was behind the attack in messages posted on its social media channels, but did not provide any evidence.

Earlier, the Taliban denied involvement in the attack.

“A suicide bomber wanted to enter the education centre,” interior ministry spokesman Tariq Arian said in a statement, AFP news agency reports.

The spokesman added that the attacker

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At least 13 killed in suicide bombing at Kabul education centre

KABUL (Reuters) – A suicide bombing on Saturday at an education centre in Afghanistan’s capital Kabul killed at least 13 people and wounded dozens, officials said.

A Taliban spokesman on Twitter denied responsibility for the attack, which came at a sensitive time as teams for the insurgents and government meet in Qatar to seek a peace deal even as violence rises and the United States withdraws troops.

A Ministry of Interior spokesman, Tariq Arian, cited security guards as identifying a bomber who detonated explosives in the street outside the Kawsar-e Danish educational centre.

Health Ministry spokesman Saeed Jami said 13 bodies had been recovered and 30 injured people transported by ambulance to hospitals. Casualties could rise, he added.

The attack came in an area of west Kabul that is home to many from the Shia community, a minority in Afghanistan targeted by groups such as Islamic State in the past.

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Portland Public Schools socks away $20 million in reserves, rural teachers call in sick after student tests positive for COVID: The week in education

Portland Public Schools spent some $8 million to provide Chromebooks for all of its students in the spring and another $10 million on coronavirus-related expenses so far this school year.

Still, the state’s largest district began this school year with more money than it anticipated through a mix of austerity measures and federal grants. And it’s putting away about $20 million as district accountants expect Gov. Kate Brown’s 2021-23 biennium budget may include cuts to state education funding.

The district doesn’t anticipate allowing students back into classrooms until at least late January. Because so many of Portland Public Schools’ employees live in Washington and Clackamas counties, the entire metro area will need to see a consistent — and drastic decline — in the number of new coronavirus cases health officials identify on a weekly basis.

Here are some of the other major education stories from this week:

Coronavirus update:

The

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Higher Education Should Reverse Structural Racism

Our institution, the University of Maryland at Baltimore County, has made enormous progress on the crisis in student success. In the 1980s, UMBC had a six-year graduation rate for all freshmen of just more than 30 percent, and for Black freshmen, the rate was 10 percentage points lower. Through a range of interventions, we have increased our six-year graduation rate to 70 percent overall, not including the 10 percent who transfer and graduate elsewhere. Moreover, we have no Black-white graduation gap.

Thirty years ago, the university administration (including one of the authors of this piece, Freeman Hrabowski) and faculty began thinking strategically about student success. The institution developed a program to support talented Black undergraduates in the natural sciences and engineering. Based on that program’s outcomes, the university also developed similar strategies for improving learning outcomes for students of all races, across fields. In 2005, UMBC established an office of

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Key to education equity lies in boosting Hub schools

Boston’s exam schools are hard to get into. The rigorous test needed to gain entrance reflects the schools’ focus on achievement, student engagement and high standards for children on track for higher education.



a large brick building: BOSTON, MA. - FEBRUARY 6: Boston Latin Academy on February 6, 2020 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Staff Photo By Matt Stone/MediaNews Group/Boston Herald)


© Provided by Boston Herald
BOSTON, MA. – FEBRUARY 6: Boston Latin Academy on February 6, 2020 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Staff Photo By Matt Stone/MediaNews Group/Boston Herald)

But in a bid to increase diversity and boost equality, many advocates assert that the exams should be scrapped in favor of selecting students for admission based on other test scores, performance and zip codes.

The goal is worthy, but the way to achieve it misses the point, and does more harm than good.

For this year, the coronavirus controlled the decision, and the Boston School Committee voted unanimously this week to suspend the use of an exam school admissions test for a year.

“To me, this is where

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