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Human Rights Groups Call On The University Of Miami To Ban Facial Recognition

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More than 20 human rights organizations have called on the University of Miami to ban facial recognition, after students accused the school of using the technology to identify student protesters, which the university has denied.

Key Facts

In a letter to the university’s Board of Trustees, the ACLU of Florida along with 21 other groups asked the university to hold an open forum with students to clarify how it identified student protesters.

The university denied it used facial recognition to identify a handful of students who attended an on-campus demonstration in September, saying they were instead identified using surveillance footage and “basic investigative techniques.”

Though campus police chief David Rivero told Forbes he believes facial recognition “doesn’t work,” he admitted campus police have used facial

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University overturns student ban on anti-abortion group, says it would violate 1st Amendment

The University of Northern Iowa is reversing the student government’s controversial decision to bar recognition of an anti-abortion group that senators said was hateful.

UNI’s president said the ban would violate the First Amendment if it was allowed to proceed.

“Neither the University nor [Northern Iowa Student Government] NISG endorse any student organization’s viewpoints by approving them as student organizations,” President Mark A. Nook wrote in a ruling released Monday. “By denying them recognition when they intend, in good faith, to engage in lawful activities, we deny them their right to free speech and assembly guaranteed to them by the First Amendment.”

Students for Life of America sent its appeal to Nook last week after the student Supreme Court upheld the ban and argued that the group’s UNI chapter would “violate a university policy guaranteeing the “right to be treated with dignity and respect by all persons involved in the

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U.S. Army Moves To Close Red Teaming University

The U.S. Army has decided to shutter the University of Foreign Military and Cultural Studies, a.k.a. “Red Teaming University,” ending one of the most revolutionary experiments in applied critical thinking and effectively pulling the plug on red teaming in the American military.

“Effective 1 October 2021, the Army will defund the University of Foreign Military and Cultural Studies (UFMCS) and repurpose our $2.5 million for other priorities. As a result, the Army, and the Department of Defense at large, will no longer possesses the ability to train and educate Red Teamers,” said the school’s director, Mark French, in a statement sent to me by UFMCS Friday. “At this stage, UFMCS leadership has exhausted the avenues for reconsideration.”

This cost-cutting move, necessitated in part by the Trump Administration’s absurd decision to steal money from the Pentagon to pay for a worthless wall on a tiny stretch of the nation’s southern border

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Brown University students create “Burn Brown Book,” outlining racism and activism on campus

A group of students at Brown University recently released the “Burn Brown Book,” a guide outlining the history of racism, capitalism and activism on campus. After two years of research and writing for a class project, the group released the 175-page guide this summer as protests against racial injustice spread throughout the country. 

The goal of the guide is to provide an alternative vision for the college: become an elite public university that supports and invests in the local community, while also providing a safe space for minority students. If the university divested from private funders and reallocated its money to the Providence area, the students argue, Brown would be held to higher standards on a range of issues, including who is being admitted and who is teaching at the university.

Noël Cousins, one of the creators of the book, told CBS News they were inspired by the “burn book”

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18-Year-Old Freshman at University of Dayton Dies of Coronavirus Complications

Michael Lang

A college freshman in Ohio has died after contracting the novel coronavirus (COVID-19).

Michael Lang, 18, died in La Grange, Illinois, “apparently due to complications from” COVID-19, the University of Dayton said in a statement, according to NBC News.

“We extend our deepest sympathy and prayers to his family, friends, professors and our campus community,” said the statement, which was reportedly sent to members of the university on Friday and obtained by NBC News. “The loss of Michael calls our campus community to honor his memory and support those who are affected by his passing.”

The University of Dayton did not immediately respond to PEOPLE’s request for comment.

It was not clear whether Lang had contracted COVID-19 on campus; the first-year student in the College of Arts and Sciences had moved home to Illinois on September 13 for remote learning, the Chicago Sun-Times reported.

RELATED: Half of American

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American University to offer more in-person classes, but remain mostly online in spring

American University will double the number of classes it offers in person next semester, though the majority of spring courses will still be online, the school’s president announced Monday.

The university also plans to increase on-campus housing.

“We intend to ramp up activity as we carefully monitor the fundamental indicators of the pandemic and evolving public health conditions,” AU President Sylvia M. Burwell said in an email to the campus. Among the factors the university will consider: local and national coronavirus case counts, the availability of testing, public health guidelines and the operating status of area K-12 schools.

While the announcement squashes hopes of a quick return to normal, the university is making an effort to bring some semblance of pre-pandemic life back to campus, Burwell said.

The number of in-person classes to be offered in the spring was not immediately available. But face-to-face course offerings will expand for

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Search resumes for university professor who went missing after hiking in Mount Rainier National Park

Rescue teams resumed their search on Sunday for a University of Washington professor who recently went missing during a hiking trip.



a man looking at the camera: Sam Dubal, an assistant professor at the University of Washington, was reported missing on October 12 after he didn't return from a hiking trip in Mount Rainier National Park.


© Courtesy Dena Dubal
Sam Dubal, an assistant professor at the University of Washington, was reported missing on October 12 after he didn’t return from a hiking trip in Mount Rainier National Park.

Sam Dubal, 33, left for Mount Rainier National Park on October 9 and was supposed to return the next day. He was reported missing on October 12 after he didn’t come home, and rescue teams have been trying to find him since.

For the first nine days, a group including park rangers, volunteer hikers and helicopter crews from the National Park Service and US Air Force searched for Dubal on the ground and by air. But poor weather on October 21 and 22 limited the abilities of rescuers to continue searching on the ground.

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The pool of Black talent in America is not ‘limited’ at all (opinion)

The CEO of Wells Fargo recently wrote a company memo to employees blaming the lack of diversity in their ranks on “a very limited pool of Black talent to recruit from.” While he subsequently cited unconscious bias, clarified his remarks and apologized, his comment serves as a teachable moment for all those interested in creating lasting, positive change in this moment of racial reckoning.



a man standing in front of a window: Dr. Wayne Frederick is President of Howard University. Moving forward the university is investing in and putting additional emphasis on its research capacity. He's pictured in the brand new Interdisciplinary Research Building on Georgia Avenue. Founded in 1867, Howard University is one of the elite HBCU's in the country, but revenue and administration problems plague the instititution and threaten its status. (Photo by Andre Chung for The Washington Post via Getty Images)


© Andre Chung for The Washington Post/Getty Images
Dr. Wayne Frederick is President of Howard University. Moving forward the university is investing in and putting additional emphasis on its research capacity. He’s pictured in the brand new Interdisciplinary Research Building on Georgia Avenue. Founded in 1867, Howard University is one of the elite HBCU’s in the country, but revenue and administration problems plague the instititution and threaten its status. (Photo by Andre Chung for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Wells Fargo’s CEO verbalized what is

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18-year-old freshman at University of Dayton apparently dies from Covid-19

An 18-year-old freshman at the University of Dayton in Ohio died Thursday “apparently due to complications from” coronavirus, school officials said.

Michael Lang, a first-year student in the College of Arts and Sciences, died in LaGrange, Illinois, after a long hospitalization, the university said. It was not clear how long Lang had been hospitalized or whether he contracted the virus on or off campus.

“We extend our deepest sympathy and prayers to his family, friends, professors and our campus community,” the university said in a message to the school on Friday. “The loss of Michael calls our campus community to honor his memory and support those who are affected by his passing.”

Lang was living on-campus before returning to his hometown and switching to remote learning on Sep. 13, the university said.

Campus community members were invited to light a candle of remembrance and pray at the school’s chapel on

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Kim Jong Un’s science policy improved industries, North Korea university says

Oct. 26 (UPI) — Kim Jong Un’s past pledge to bring improvements at North Korean farms and factories is being highlighted on the website of the regime’s top university.

Kim Il Sung University recently posted online a past statement from the North Korean leader calling for the widespread application of science and technology, South Korean news service NK Economy reported Monday.

The remarks from Kim were made in June 2013, when the leader visited a machine plant and met with a local official who directly requested technical documents that could go toward improving production, the university said. Kim agreed to the request, and the leader’s decision has been beneficial to other North Korean entities, according to the university.

“Today, in North Korea’s factories, enterprises and cooperative farms, science and technology dissemination offices are well established, demonstrating enormous vitality in the struggle for science and technology talent,” the North Korean statement

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