Department of Food Science | UMass Amherst

FEATURES

 

Virologist explains why consumers shouldn’t fear the grocery store amidst the COVID-19 outbreak

As states continue issuing quarantine guidelines and rumors swirl about lockdowns, many people are stocking up on food and other essentials. But during a global outbreak, how safe is the grocery store? People are left in a catch-22 knowing that if they don’t venture to the supermarket they could be left without food, while also fearing contracting coronavirus while shopping. Virologist Matthew Moorefood science, debunks myths about grocery shopping amidst the coronavirus pandemic in a recent article published on The Hill.  CNS News March 18, 2020

 

UMass sensory scientist researches how diminished taste function can affect cancer patients’ post-treatment diets 

Alissa Nolden of UMass food Science set out to review the literature about the impact of cancer patients’ sense of taste and smell on their “food behavior,” defined as any behavior that affects patients’ overall nutritional health, such as their desire to eat, food preferences and consumption. Nolden’s goal is to develop a better understanding of changes in taste and how that affects cancer patients’ ability to enjoy food and meet optimum nutritional needs during and after treatment.  Her review evaluated 11 studies published between 1982 and 2018 “that psychophysically measured taste and smell function and assessed some aspect of food behavior.” Nolden found a reduced taste function, particularly for sweet flavors, among people with cancer. And that diminished taste was associated with a reduced appetite; avoidance of certain foods, including meat; and a lower intake of calories and protein.  CNS News December 18, 2019

UMass Amherst Researchers Develop New Technology to Detect Foodborne Disease

University of Massachusetts Amherst food scientist Matthew Moore has received two grants from the USDA to apply new technology in an effort to more quickly detect and trace foodborne disease caused by noroviruses and bacteria.

News and Media Relations October 31, 2019

 

Source Article