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Science : NPR

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David Biello

Elizabeth Zeeuw / TED

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Elizabeth Zeeuw / TED

David Biello: A Journey Into Uncharted Territory

(At left) A colorized electron micrograph image of the influenza virus. (At right) Color-enhanced electron micrograph image of SARS-CoV-2 virus particles, isolated from a patient.

Science Source

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Science Source

No, The Coronavirus Isn’t Another Flu

Dr. Deborah Birx, who coordinates the White House Coronavirus Task Force, criticized a test “where 50% or 47% are false positives” at a briefing on March 17.

Kevin Dietsch/UPI/Bloomberg via Getty Images

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Kevin Dietsch/UPI/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Pike Place Market is nearly empty in downtown Seattle on March 10.

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John Moore/Getty Images

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, headquartered near Tarrytown, N.Y., is just one of the companies now working to identify and reproduce large quantities of antibodies that could prevent or treat COVID-19. Senior R&D Specialist Kristen Pascal works on COVID-19 research for Regeneron.

Rani Levy/Regeneron Pharmaceuticals

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Rani Levy/Regeneron Pharmaceuticals

President Trump’s letter to U.S. governors about the coronavirus.

The White House

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The White House

After the Food and Drug Administration granted Gilead Sciences orphan drug status for its experimental drug remdesivir on Tuesday, Gilead asked that the agency rescind that status Wednesday.

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

President Trump takes questions from reporters Monday. Joining him at the press briefing on coronavirus are Vice President Pence; Attorney General William Barr; Dr. Deborah Birx, White House coronavirus response coordinator; and Navy Rear Adm. John Polowczyk, who leads FEMA’s task force on the supply chain.

Alex Brandon/AP

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Alex Brandon/AP

Nalini M. Nadkarni is a professor of biology at the University of Utah.

Sybil Gotsch

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Sybil Gotsch

Exploring The Canopy With ‘TreeTop Barbie’

Gilead Sciences CEO Daniel O’Day (center) took part in a meeting of the White House Coronavirus Task Force on March 2.

Andrew Harnik/AP

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Andrew Harnik/AP

The nearly empty baggage claim area at McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas on March 19, 2020.

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

New York City, U.S. Epicenter, Braces For Peak

This undated handout photo from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows a microscopic view of the Coronavirus at the CDC in Atlanta, Georgia.

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Getty Images

Why Is The Coronavirus So Good At Spreading?

Transmission electron micrograph of particles of SARS-CoV-2 — the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.


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NIAID/Flickr

Why Hoarding Of Hydroxychloroquine Needs To Stop

Late sleepers are people too. Well, most of them.

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Fox Photos/Getty Images

Dr. Syed Moin Hassan was riled up. “I don’t know who needs to hear this,” he posted on Twitter, “BUT YOU ARE NOT LAZY IF YOU ARE WAKING UP AT NOON.” Hassan, who is the Sleep Medicine Fellow at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, speaks to Short Wave’s Emily Kwong about de-stigmatizing sleeping in late, and why a good night’s rest is so important for your immune system.

It’s Okay To Sleep Late (But Do It For Your Immune System)

A sign on the Bradley Beach, N.J., oceanfront urges people to practice social distancing even in the outdoors during the coronavirus outbreak. On Saturday, New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy signed an executive order directing all residents to stay at home.

Wayne Parry/AP

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Wayne Parry/AP

Medical workers transport a patient into a newly built temporary hospital on March 16 in Rome. Doctors in Italy are making difficult decisions about who should receive care.

Andreas Solaro/AFP via Getty Images

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Andreas Solaro/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Hospitals Prepare Guidelines For Who Gets Care Amid Coronavirus Surge

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