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Electoral College’s Republican Bias Smaller Than When Trump Won 2016 Election: Study

The Electoral College has historically favored the Republican party, but this year the bias towards the GOP may be smaller than when President Donald Trump won the 2016 election, according to a new study.



A stock image shows buttons reading "Vote 2020" ahead of the presidential election on November 3. Researchers have simulated the part Electoral College votes may play in the election.


© Getty
A stock image shows buttons reading “Vote 2020” ahead of the presidential election on November 3. Researchers have simulated the part Electoral College votes may play in the election.

The research comes with just over a week to go until the election day. Polls indicate a win for Democratic nominee Joe Biden.

Researchers at Columbia University used the results of the nine U.S. presidential elections from 1984 to 2016 to create a simulation to predict how the Electoral College vote may factor into the results of the upcoming 2020 election.

They noted that the system has favored the Republican party for a number of reasons, but found that the bias towards the Republican

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Milwaukee Area Colleges Commit to National “Moon Shot for Equity”

EAB launches initiative to erase equity gaps in college completion for underserved student populations

Moon Shot for Equity logo
Moon Shot for Equity logo
Moon Shot for Equity logo

Washington, DC, Oct. 21, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Education firm EAB today announced the launch of “Moon Shot for Equity,” an initiative that aims to close equity gaps within regional cohorts of two- and four-year colleges and universities by 2030. Participating institutions will work together and with EAB to help more underrepresented students of color and other historically underserved populations graduate from college. The first regional consortium of institutions to commit to Moon Shot for Equity includes the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee Area Technical College, Carthage College, and University of Wisconsin-Parkside. The four schools announced their commitment to the project in a joint statement earlier today.

“NASA’s original moon shot proved that Americans can overcome nearly any obstacle if we fully commit ourselves and work together

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Feds say US colleges ‘massively’ underreport foreign funding | National News

The report did not identify which universities were connected to those entities. Since coming under federal scrutiny, the 12 schools disclosed a combined $6.5 billion in foreign funding that was previously unreported, the department said.

The Association of American Universities, which represents research universities, said the report is “less a serious security assessment than it is a partisan and politically driven attack on America’s leading research universities.”

“While the Department of Education purports to be concerned about threats, it has consistently failed to respond to repeated requests for clarity, transparency, and guidelines,” the group said in a statement.

Some universities had previously acknowledged errors in reporting and sought to correct them. Yale said it failed to submit foreign funding reports for the years 2014 to 2017 but later corrected the omission.

The department said its review is ongoing and that it is still gathering information from universities.

In announcing the

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California Community Colleges receives historic $100-million gift for students most in need

The California Community Colleges announced Tuesday that it has received the largest ever gift to such institutions in the nation — $100 million — to help more students complete degrees, transfer to universities and support their basic living expenses.



a group of people looking at a bird in a dark room: A historic gift to California Community Colleges will help more students complete degrees, transfer to universities and cover their basic living expenses. Above, Santa Monica College graduates are silhouetted at sunset as they line up to receive their diplomas. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)


© (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)
A historic gift to California Community Colleges will help more students complete degrees, transfer to universities and cover their basic living expenses. Above, Santa Monica College graduates are silhouetted at sunset as they line up to receive their diplomas. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

The gift, from an anonymous donor to the Jay Pritzker Foundation, is described by college officials as a recognition of the role community colleges play in educating Californians and preparing them for the workforce. It also addresses the shortcomings of a system that is struggling in many regions to adequately and equitably address the higher education needs

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Chicopee laser company, 2 Springfield colleges to create research and education facility with $2.5 million state grant

CHICOPEE – A local business that specializes in creating and supplying high-tech lasers will partner with Westfield New England University to establish a research and development center and strengthen the school’s education program with the help of a $2.5 million state grant.

The project that will join Convergent Photonics with the university is the fourth of its kind statewide and the first in Western Massachusetts. Springfield Technical Community College will also be involved in the program.

“It is such an amazing project. I’m so glad they picked Chicopee for it,” Mayor John L. Vieau said. “This will give them an advanced labor force with skilled workers.”

The award was announced in a small event at the company’s headquarters on 117 East Main St. Mike Kennealy, state director of Housing and Economic Development, Western New England President Robert Johnson, State Reps. Joseph Wagner and Jose Tosado, company leaders and others attended.

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Student Parent Voices Are Critical To Colleges’ Civic Engagement Plans

Connection. Belonging. A sense of community. These are critical to students feeling like they are a part of their college community. Yet, far too many parenting college students feel alone on their campuses. Generation Hope’s national student parent survey found that 40% of student parents felt isolated at their institutions. 

We know that nationally one in five college students is parenting, but the data is harder to come by at the institutional level because most schools do not track the parenting status of their students. This means they do not know how many student parents are on their campus, and the needs and unique experiences of these students are likely to be overlooked. As a respondent to Generation Hope’s survey said: “I feel like there is no one like me walking around campus.”

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Illinois community colleges see big drop in enrollment amid the coronavirus pandemic, reflecting national declines in higher education

Enrollment at Illinois community colleges plunged nearly 14% this fall, an indication that low-income and older students who typically favor the institutions might be struggling to pursue higher education because of the coronavirus pandemic.



a large brick building with grass in front of a house: Enrollment at Oakton Community College, whose Skokie campus is shown here, dropped this fall by about 12.4% to 7,079 students.


© Erin Hooley / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Enrollment at Oakton Community College, whose Skokie campus is shown here, dropped this fall by about 12.4% to 7,079 students.

All but three of the state’s 48 community colleges saw substantial headcount declines, according to initial data from the Illinois Community College Board. Compared to last year, about 37,200 fewer students enrolled in for-credit classes this fall. Some of the biggest drops were among students over age 30 and in career-track courses such as nursing, construction and welding.

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The preliminary data, collected in an online survey at the end of class registration, mirrors national trends. The latest analysis by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center shows community

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It’s important for Boston College’s defensive backs that they look good

As simple as it seems for a defensive back to keep his eyes trained on the receiver he’s guarding, it’s easy for the eyes to wander.

“You do not want to be a violator,” said Eagles strong safety Jahmin Muse. “You do not want to come in Sunday to be known as an eye violator. It’s not a good look.”

But it happens.

“It’s definitely happened to me,” Muse said.

To improve a pass defense that gave up the most yards in the Atlantic Coast Conference last season, the Eagles had to start with discipline. Last year, opponents threw for 3,711 yards against the Eagles. This season, BC is giving up just 234.2 yards per game.

“Eye discipline is one of the most important things in defensive football,” coach Jeff Hafley said in the run-up to Saturday night’s game at Virginia Tech. “Sometimes guys see too much, and they

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U, Minnesota State colleges receive $166 million in state bonding bill

Minnesota’s public college systems will receive a combined $166 million in state funding for campus repairs and renovations as part of a nearly $1.9 billion bonding bill passed by the Legislature Thursday.

Lawmakers approved $75 million in funding for the University of Minnesota, which includes $38.5 million for repairs and maintenance at its five campuses and about $29 million to renovate the 107-year-old Child Development Building on the Twin Cities campus.

The U had sought $317 million in capital funds, including about $66 million to build a roughly 102,000-square-foot chemistry undergraduate teaching laboratory on its Twin Cities campus. They received about $3 million for that project.

“With the Legislature’s action this week, the University will help lead the state’s economic recovery during this challenging period of our shared history,” U President Joan Gabel said in a statement. “This will allow us to inject state dollars into bonding projects quickly, putting

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One LI college’s struggle with COVID-19

LIU Post in Brookville goes remote after rising cases

According to a letter issued by LIU President Kimberly R. Cline, the decision came after rising cases among students attributed to off-campus parties.

She said additional cases were reported in recent days by students who were in contact with those at the off-campus gatherings.

“While our numbers are well below the mandated thresholds for remote learning, we have chosen to act now,” she wrote in the Wednesday night letter. “This gives us the best opportunity to reverse the trend and welcome you back in two weeks.”

While other local universities have relied heavily on remote instruction, LIU — which according to its website instructs nearly 15,000 students with main campuses in Brooklyn and Brookville — opted to offer most classes

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