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Walmart and North Carolina A&T State University Team up to Launch ‘Equity in Education Initiative’

BENTONVILLE, Ark.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Today, Walmart and America’s largest and top-ranked historically black university, North Carolina A&T State University, are announcing plans to launch the Equity in Education Initiative, a new program aimed at increasing the number of African American college graduates securing careers in fields critical to the nation’s workforce. The program will support undergraduate students with tailored resources and assistance as they pursue degrees in business, engineering and other professional disciplines.

The Equity in Education Initiative, powered by a $5 million investment via Walmart which is the largest corporate investment in North Carolina A&T to date, will deliver a spectrum of resources through four focus areas:

  • The Black Male Initiative, housed in the Willie A. Deese College of Business and Economics and created and implemented with seed funding by the ELC, will address Black male achievement, retention and graduation rates, often lower than that of their female peers.
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University of Kentucky fraternity sanctioned for a COVID-19-related violation

A University of Kentucky fraternity was sanctioned after some of its members were involved in a conduct hearing for allegedly violating COVID-19 and public health related sections of the student code of conduct, a UK spokesperson said.

UK’s Sigma Alpha Epsilon chapter is under further university review, UK spokesperson Jay Blanton said and the Kentucky Kernel first reported. It’s unclear what the sanctions are and what specific events led to the university investigating the fraternity. Students who violate UK’s COVID-19 guidelines are subject to discipline.

Two other UK fraternities — Pi Kappa Alpha and Delta Sigma Phi — are currently on disciplinary probation until fall 2021 for alcohol misuse and failing to follow UK’s COVID-19 guidelines, the university’s Office of Student Conduct website shows. According to the office, the disciplinary probation means that the fraternities are “not in good standing” with the university and subsequent violations could lead to

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University of Iowa names interim to business dean post after national search

IOWA CITY — After considering six finalists in two waves over the last year to become the new dean of the University of Iowa Tippie College of Business, the administration has chosen internal candidate and interim dean Amy Kristof-Brown to fill the post.

Kristof-Brown is a research professor of management and became senior associate dean for the college in 2017. She served in numerous roles before that, directing the department’s graduate studies and serving as department executive officer.

Kristof-Brown initially joined Tippie as an assistant professor in the Department of Management and Organizations in 1997. She stepped in as interim dean March 1, when Dean Sarah Gardial left to lead the Massey College of Business at Belmont University in Nashville, Tenn.

As permanent dean, Kristof-Brown will earn an annual salary of $450,000 — up from her interim pay of $319,250. She was making $219,444 as associate dean. Gardial, before leaving,

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Search Continues For Man Who Assaulted Minnesota State Trooper; St. John’s University On Lockdown

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — St. John’s University has been on lockdown for several hours as authorities search for a man they say attacked a Minnesota State Patrol trooper Thursday morning near St. Joseph.

The state patrol says the suspect was stopped for drunk driving, but fled after punching a trooper. The suspect then led police on a chase along Intestate 94, which ended after officers used stop sticks to blow out the suspect’s tires. The suspect got out of the car and ran off.

One of the officers in the pursuit reported that during the chase the suspect reached out of his vehicle and appeared to have something black in his hand, possibly a gun.

Authorities say the suspect also robbed a victim of their clothes, cellphone and keys. The victim’s car is accounted for, however, and is not stolen.

The suspect is described as a Black man in his

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Official: Ethiopia’s Latest Airstrike Hits Tigray University | World News

By CARA ANNA, Associated Press

NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — A university official says the latest airstrike by Ethiopia’s military has struck the school in the capital of the defiant Tigray region and caused major damage, while the United States says neither side in the conflict is heeding calls for de-escalation.

The senior official described Thursday’s airstrike in an email shared with The Associated Press. It was not immediately clear if anyone was killed or wounded in the airstrike in Mekele.

“How on earth” can a government bombard its own people, the senior official asked. The AP is not naming the official because they could not be reached directly.

There was no immediate comment from Ethiopia’s government, which has been fighting with the Tigray regional forces since Nov. 4 after an attack on a military base there. Both sides have carried out airstrikes. Each regards the other as illegal, the result

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Census ‘Anomalies’ May Force Bureau To Miss Dec. 31 Reporting Deadline : NPR

A supporter of President-elect Joe Biden holds up a phone displaying the Electoral College map in Philadelphia on Nov. 7.

John Minchillo/AP


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John Minchillo/AP

A supporter of President-elect Joe Biden holds up a phone displaying the Electoral College map in Philadelphia on Nov. 7.

John Minchillo/AP

The Census Bureau has uncovered routine “anomalies” in the results of this year’s national count that may force the bureau to miss a legal reporting deadline. That outcome could thwart President Trump’s unprecedented attempt to change who is counted in numbers that determine each state’s share of congressional seats and Electoral College votes for the next decade.

“These types of processing anomalies have occurred in past censuses,” the bureau’s director, Steven Dillingham, said in a statement released Thursday. “I am directing the Census Bureau to utilize all resources available to resolve this as expeditiously as possible.”

The first set of

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New education coalition to unveil racial justice agenda for mayoral, City Council candidates


A student walks past an Hispanic Heritage display in the hallway at school.

In this Nov. 7, 2019, photo, a student walks past an Hispanic Heritage display in the hallway at Crosby High School in Waterbury, Conn. | Jessica Hill/AP

A new citywide education coalition is looking to push 2021 mayoral and City Council candidates to adopt policies centered around racial justice in schools and make bigger investments to support vulnerable student populations.

The coalition, New Yorkers for Racially Just Public Schools, is unveiling “A People’s Agenda for Education and Racial Justice,” centered on issues such as police-free schools, culturally responsive education and getting rid of school admissions policies they say fuel school segregation — a pervasive problem in one of the most segregated school systems in America.

Maria Bautista, campaigns director for the Alliance for Quality Education, said the group started having conversations about three years ago, amid opposition to schools Chancellor Richard Carranza’s push for culturally responsive education and the elimination

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Priyanka Chopra Jonas and Henrietta Fore Discuss the Global Education Crisis

The myth that children aren’t being impacted by the coronavirus pandemic urgently needs to be dispelled, say actor Priyanka Chopra Jonas and UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore.



Henrietta H. Fore, Priyanka are posing for a picture


© Provided by Meredith Corporation


During a TIME 100 Talks discussion, Chopra and Fore spoke with TIME Senior Health Correspondent Alice Park about the challenges that children around the world, especially in developing countries, are facing due to the COVID-19 pandemic. “This is an extraordinary generation of children, but this is an extraordinary crisis against them,” Fore said.

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One problem that both Jonas and Fore placed particular emphasis on is the lack of access to education that many children are currently experiencing. “No matter what their circumstances are, even if they’re in refugee camps where they don’t have access to formal educational papers, the one thing that [children] want is their right to an education,” said Jonas, who became a UNICEF

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Iowa Department of Education grants online waiver for Ankeny schools

The Iowa Department of Education granted a 14-day remote learning waiver for the entire Ankeny School District on Thursday.

What happens if a student or teacher tests positive for COVID-19 at an Iowa school?

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The 14-day period granted by the state starts Nov. 23 and lasts until Dec. 7. During this period of time, the district is also required to cease any in-person extracurricular activities. Extracurricular activities may continue in an online or virtual manner.



a group of people standing in a room: Southview Middle School students get up and move around during a "brain break" in Kim Southard’s Spanish II class in between formative assessments in Ankeny.


© Ankeny Community School District/Special to the Register
Southview Middle School students get up and move around during a “brain break” in Kim Southard’s Spanish II class in between formative assessments in Ankeny.

The Ankeny school board voted Monday night allow the district’s administration to apply for the 14-day waiver following the most recent spike in COVID-19 cases across the state. 

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In the lead-up to the 2020 election,

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Number of university students getting first class degrees rises again



chart, bar chart: MailOnline logo


© Provided by Daily Mail
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The proportion of university students getting first class degrees has risen again, with the figure nearly doubling in the last eight years, the higher education watchdog has found. 

Analysis from the Office for Students (OfS) found that the proportion of graduates who attained top degrees rose from 15.7 per cent in 2010-11 to 29.5 per cent in 2018-19, prompting concerns about grade inflation.

Much of the increase cannot be explained by factors that may affect attainment, the report said.



chart, bar chart: Analysis from the Office for Students (OfS) found that the proportion of graduates who attained top degrees rose from 15.7 per cent in 2010-11 to 29.5 per cent in 2018-19, prompting concerns about grade inflation


© Provided by Daily Mail
Analysis from the Office for Students (OfS) found that the proportion of graduates who attained top degrees rose from 15.7 per cent in 2010-11 to 29.5 per cent in 2018-19, prompting concerns about grade inflation

Over 42,000 more students graduated with firsts in the summer of 2018-19 than eight years before, the figures showed, but the increase has ‘slowed’

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