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Our experts preview the top 25 men’s college basketball teams

The 2020-21 men’s basketball season gets underway on Wednesday, November 25, as the coronavirus pandemic continues to rage on nationwide. The COVID-19 shutdowns began in March of this year as all postseason basketball — and then the rest of NCAA sports — were canceled en masse.



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Well, we’re back, baby!

Kind of. There are already myriad teams that have paused their seasons due to outbreaks within their programs — including No. 2 Baylor, No. 12 Tennessee, Ole Miss, and Florida — causing some reshuffling of multi-team events or canceling season openers.

But we will have some men’s college basketball action starting, so we’re here to prepare you for the season. We reached out to the experts across our NCAA team communities to get the low-down on the 25 teams that are ranked in the 2020-21 preseason AP Poll.

Let’s get to it!

25. Michigan

Projected lineup: G Mike Smith, G

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TEXEL signs an agreement with Arizona State University to move new battery technology towards commercialization in the US

STOCKHOLM, Nov. 24, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The battery technology development company, TEXEL Energy Storage (TEXEL), and Arizona State University (ASU) have signed a cooperation agreement with the purpose to bring a new battery technology towards commercialization in the United States. The new battery technology that is originally developed by Savannah River National laboratory (SRNL), is potentially much more cost effective than Lithium-Ion batteries in large scale and is 100% circular.

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), one of US Department of Energy’s (DOE) seventeen national laboratories, and the laboratory behind the development of the Hydrogen Bomb, also considered as one of the world’s leading research labs on hydrogen related technologies, has developed a new battery technology, based on thermochemical Metal Hydrides. In 2018, SRNL and TEXEL signed an exclusive agreement with the aim to move the technology towards commercialization.

“The new battery technology is a huge step forward

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Newsmax CEO Thinks Trump Should Concede When States Certify Elections, Would Support Overturning Electoral College

Chistopher Ruddy, the CEO of Newsmax Media, a conservative multimedia platform that has supported President Donald Trump’s claims of voter fraud, said in an interview that Trump should concede the race when states certify their elections.



a person wearing a hat: President Donald Trump throws hats to supporters during a rally at Wilkes-Barre Scranton International Airport November 2, 2020, in Avoca, Pennsylvania. On Tuesday, Pennsylvania officially certified its election results for Joe Biden. Newsmax CEO Christopher Ruddy said in an interview that Trump should concede the race one states certify their results.


© Brendan Smialowski / AFP/Getty
President Donald Trump throws hats to supporters during a rally at Wilkes-Barre Scranton International Airport November 2, 2020, in Avoca, Pennsylvania. On Tuesday, Pennsylvania officially certified its election results for Joe Biden. Newsmax CEO Christopher Ruddy said in an interview that Trump should concede the race one states certify their results.

In a conversation with Isaac Chotiner published in The New Yorker on Tuesday, Ruddy discussed his close relationship with Trump and how Newsmax has chosen to support the president in the post-election news cycle.

But when asked whether or not the conservative media outlet would support an attempt by Trump to overturn certified election results, Ruddy said he

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Man in charge of Cambridge University Library when two of Charles Darwin’s notepads were ‘stolen’

  • Peter Fox was head of Cambridge University Library when books, worth millions, were lost in November 2000
  • When their absence was realised in January 2001, it was ‘assumed’ they had been put back on the wrong shelf
  • One of books contained the Darwin’s Tree of Life sketch, exploring evolutionary relationship between species
  • Following an ‘extensive search’, curators have now concluded that the famous books have likely been stolen
  • Do YOU know what happened to the books? Email [email protected]

This is the librarian in charge of Cambridge University Library when two priceless notebooks belonging to scientist Charles Darwin went missing 20 years ago.

Peter Fox was head of the library when the books, worth ‘many millions’, went missing on his watch in November 2000.

When their absence was discovered in January 2001, it was ‘assumed’ they had been put back on the wrong shelf, and police were never alerted.

One of

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Ranking the five toughest nonconference slates

With tip-off for the 2020-21 college basketball season looming Wednesday, there are still dozens of Division I programs — and some leagues — that have not released their schedules yet. It’s a reminder of how much uncertainty remains for a season that will begin in the throes of the COVID-19 pandemic. But even though the season is getting a later than usual start and is already rife with disruptions due to the virus, there are still some great nonconference battles on the docket.



a man with an orange ball in the air: LAS VEGAS, NEVADA - MARCH 10: Joel Ayayi #11 of the Gonzaga Bulldogs reacts after hitting a 3-pointer against the Saint Mary's Gaels during the championship game of the West Coast Conference basketball tournament at the Orleans Arena on March 10, 2020 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The Bulldogs defeated the Gaels 84-66. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)


© Provided by CBS Sports

LAS VEGAS, NEVADA – MARCH 10: Joel Ayayi #11 of the Gonzaga Bulldogs reacts after hitting a 3-pointer against the Saint Mary’s Gaels during the championship game of the West Coast Conference basketball tournament at the Orleans Arena on March 10, 2020 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The Bulldogs defeated the Gaels 84-66. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)


Some programs have clearly prioritized

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College football rankings: Nebraska reenters The Bottom 25 after swift return to the loss column

25. Nebraska 1-3 So maybe Luke McCaffery isn’t the answer after all? The Huskers are back in action this weekend against an Iowa team that’s beaten them five years in a row. (Last Week: Not Ranked) 24. Texas State 2-9 My Fightin’ Spavs are back in the win column (!) as they ended a seven-game losing streak by beating Arkansas State 47-45. It wasn’t enough to escape The Bottom 25, but it was a long time coming. Also, shoutout to Texas State for getting 11 games in this season. If this week’s season-finale against Coastal Carolina gets played, the Bobcats will have gotten in a full 12-game regular season. That’s remarkable in 2020. (20) 23. Michigan State 1-3 Talk about insult to injury. Michigan State’s game against Maryland was canceled due to COVID concerns at Maryland, and the Spartans drop into The Bottom 25 afterward. This week, Sparty gets Northwestern
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San Antonio’s first double lung transplant for COVID-19 performed at University Hospital

A patient who suffered permanent lung damage from COVID-19 is recovering after receiving a double lung transplant at University Hospital several weeks ago.

The surgery in late October was the first of its kind to be performed in San Antonio. Only a small number of the procedures have taken place in Texas.

Before the transplant, the University patient had required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, a type of life support that bypasses the lungs by manually adding oxygen and removing carbon dioxide from the blood.

Doctors with University Transplant Center said the patient, who is from the South Texas region, has asked for privacy at this time.

On ExpressNews.com: University Hospital to perform double lung transplants for COVID-19 patients with irreversible lung damage

Over the past few months, a handful of critically ill coronavirus patients from San Antonio have undergone lung transplants, but their procedures had all been performed elsewhere.

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Patriots receiver Damiere Byrd reaches new heights with career day despite loss to Texans

Midway through the third quarter, Newton launched a deep shot to Byrd, who was able to track the ball and gain enough separation to make an over-the-shoulder grab right in front of the end zone. Upon crossing the goal line, Byrd immediately fired the ball into the stadium’s wall in excitement. He and Newton celebrated moments later by connecting their hands in the air to form a flying bird.

The impressive score was just one of Byrd’s big plays on the day. Five of his six receptions delivered gains of 15 yards or more. The only one that didn’t was an 8-yard, third-down play that still converted for a first down, thanks to his extra effort in fighting for yardage.

“Damiere has been doing a great job on those routes,” Newton said. “For him to keep coming downhill and for it to show up on game day, it just shows

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Massachusetts education officials considering at-home MCAS testing in the spring during COVID pandemic

With the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System scheduled to be administered this winter and spring during the coronavirus pandemic, one teacher said it will be a “logistical nightmare” for districts that have been fully remote to administer the test.

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But Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Commissioner Jeffrey Riley on Tuesday said the tests are still on track to be administered, but that the department is considering options like limiting the amount of time for which students take the test or at-home testing this spring.

MCAS tests in January and February are coming up for students, including those who need to re-test to graduate and English language learners.

“When we think about the winter testing, as we’ve seen over the last few weeks, we acknowledge the number of students schools and districts affected by COVID has increased,” Riley said during a Massachusetts Board of Elementary and Secondary Education

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Commentary: Education’s unprecedented present may forecast future problems

As we approach the end of a year in which the COVID-19 pandemic brought unprecedented upheaval to education, and as schools lurch backward and forward and back again in varying stages of reopening their campuses, parents are understandably worried about the future.

They wonder about the long-term impact of all the disruption, and if their children will suffer lasting harm.

The answer: Yes. No. It depends.

Now that I’ve cleared that up for you, I will amend the above to state categorically that no one can predict with anything approaching precision how the long-range effects on students will manifest. Although we have hints from history, some educated guesses and earnest efforts to mitigate the impact, the uniqueness of our current situation obstructs our long-range view toward what lies ahead.

The 1918 flu pandemic fundamentally altered the world, but that was a different disease that hit young people particularly hard, and

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