Vacunacionadultos

University of Utah researchers discover genes linked to suicide

SALT LAKE CITY – Researchers at University of Utah Health’s Huntsman Mental Health Institute have detected more than 20 genes that may play a role in suicide.

The research is the first of its kind, and a Utah mother who is still grieving doesn’t find the results surprising.

Michelle Nelson stands in the bright kitchen of her 101-year-old house in Salt Lake City.

“Amethyst, opalite and crystal,” she said, picking up the small stones from a dish on the counter.

She collects them to help her heal because picking up the pieces after loss is daunting.

“I take Roan everywhere I go,” she said.

Nelson collects heart rocks — stones that naturally form into a heart shape which she finds outside.

“It’s like a gift from nature that reminds me of him,” Nelson said.

Two years ago, her 16-year-old son, Roan McClain, died by suicide.

“It was the biggest shock

Read More

Scientists discover new family of quasiparticles in graphene-based materials

graphene
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

A group of researchers led by Sir Andre Geim and Dr. Alexey Berdyugin at The University of Manchester have discovered and characterized a new family of quasiparticles named ‘Brown-Zak fermions’ in graphene-based superlattices.


The team achieved this breakthrough by aligning the atomic lattice of a graphene layer to that of an insulating boron nitride sheet, dramatically changing the properties of the graphene sheet.

The study follows years of successive advances in graphene-boron nitride superlattices which allowed the observation of a fractal pattern known as the Hofstadter’s butterfly—and today (Friday, November 13) the researchers report another highly surprising behavior of particles in such structures under applied magnetic field.

“It is well known, that in zero magnetic field, electrons move in straight trajectories and if you apply a magnetic field they start to bend and move in circles”, explain Julien Barrier and Dr. Piranavan Kumaravadivel, who carried out

Read More

Scientists discover new monkey species in Myanmar

Scientists have discovered a new species of monkeys in central Myanmar with the help of a 100-year-old tissue sample.



a small bird perched on a tree branch: A handout picture made available by the German Primate Center (DPZ)- Leibniz Institute for Primate Research on Nov. 10, 2020, shows an adult female and juvenile Popa langur (Trachypithecus popa) in the crater of Mount Popa, Myanmar Myanmar.


© Thaung Win/German Primate Center (DPZ)- Lei/AFP via Getty Images
A handout picture made available by the German Primate Center (DPZ)- Leibniz Institute for Primate Research on Nov. 10, 2020, shows an adult female and juvenile Popa langur (Trachypithecus popa) in the crater of Mount Popa, Myanmar Myanmar.

The primate, named Popa langur after the extinct volcano Mount Popa, has been “hiding in plain sight” in central Myanmar, according to the conservation organization Fauna & Flora International. The area of Mount Popa houses the largest population of the species.



a monkey sitting on a branch: In this undated handout photo released by the German Primate Center (DPZ) on Nov. 11, 2020, the newly discovered primate named Popa langur (Trachypithecus popa) is seen on a tree branch on Mount Popa, Myanmar.


© Thaung Win/German Primate Center (DPZ)- Lei/AFP via Getty Images
In this undated handout photo released by the German Primate Center (DPZ) on Nov. 11, 2020, the newly discovered primate named Popa langur (Trachypithecus popa) is seen on a tree branch on

Read More

Norwegian archeologists using radar discover buried Viking ship

Norwegian archaeologists have discovered a Viking burial site, complete with a long-buried, 62-foot-long Viking ship. The find was revealed in a study published Wednesday in the journal Antiquity. The site is located in Gjellestad, which is home to the Jell Mound, one of the largest Iron Age burial mounds in Scandinavia. In addition to the previously unknown Viking ship burial, the area may include a feast hall, farmhouse and some kind of religious structure.



a chain on a table


© Twitter


The scientist didn’t have to dig up the site; instead, they used ground-penetrating radar to map the underground features.

Loading...

Load Error

“The site seems to have belonged to the very top echelon of the Iron Age elite of the area, and would have been a focal point for the exertion of political and social control of the region,” Lars Gustavsen, lead study author, said in a press release.

Researchers say the site has its

Read More

Norwegian Archaeologists Discover Viking Age Ship Burial

Archaeologists using radar technology have discovered a millennium-old ship burial in southeastern Norway, at a site that they hope will offer clues about life during the period after the fall of the Roman Empire through the end of the Viking Age.

Lars Gustavsen, a researcher at the Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research and the lead author of a paper on the findings, published Wednesday in the journal Antiquity, said his team made the discovery in April 2018 in Gjellestad, Norway. A farmer notified the local authorities about his plans to build drainage ditches in one of his fields, prompting the archaeological survey.

“Before we started we knew about maybe one other site like it in that area,” Mr. Gustavsen said. “Now we have another one that could probably provide us with more information about how society was built, what kind of political system they had, what kind of technological

Read More

Scientists discover new endangered primate species in Myanmar, with only 260 left

Scientists have discovered a new primate species in the jungles of Myanmar — and it’s already at risk of extinction.



a monkey sitting on a tree branch: The Popa langur, a newly discovered primate species in Myanmar that is critically endangered.


© Thaung Win
The Popa langur, a newly discovered primate species in Myanmar that is critically endangered.

The Popa langur is a type of monkey with a long tail, rings around its eyes, and a crest of fur on top of its head. There are only an estimated 200 to 260 left, according to a news release by the London Natural History Museum, which collaborated on this study.

The research team named the Popa langurs after the sacred extinct volcano Mount Popa and classified them as “critically endangered.”

“Sadly this is a bittersweet discovery due to the limited number of individuals left in the wild and fragmented populations,” said Roberto Portela Miguez, a senior curator at the Natural History Museum, in the release.

“The hope is that by giving

Read More

Scientists discover new primate species that’s already in danger of extinction

The Popa langur is a type of monkey with a long tail, rings around its eyes, and a crest of fur on top of its head. There are only an estimated 200 to 260 left, according to a news release by the London Natural History Museum, which collaborated on this study.

The research team named the Popa langurs after the sacred extinct volcano Mount Popa and classified them as “critically endangered.”

“Sadly this is a bittersweet discovery due to the limited number of individuals left in the wild and fragmented populations,” said Roberto Portela Miguez, a senior curator at the Natural History Museum, in the release.

“The hope is that by giving this species the scientific status and notoriety it merits, there will be even more concerted efforts in protecting this area and the few other remaining populations.”

The scientists, spanning three organizations, published their findings on Wednesday in the
Read More

Australian scientists discover two new marsupial species of greater gliders

If you take a walk through the forests of Australia’s east coast, you might come across the greater glider — a possum-sized marsupial with big ears and a long furry tail, that glides from tree to tree.



a cat sitting on top of a small animal: The greater glider (Petauroides volans) at night in Queensland, Australia


© Auscape International Pty Ltd/Alamy
The greater glider (Petauroides volans) at night in Queensland, Australia

Until last week, the glider was classified as a single species, but a new study found that it was actually three different ones, marking the discovery of two new marsupial species.

“Australia’s biodiversity just got a lot richer,” said Professor Andrew Krockenberger of James Cook University, who was part of the research team. “It’s not every day that new mammals are confirmed, let alone two new mammals.”

Scientists have long suspected the glider might be several species, though there was never sufficient proof, he added in a news release from the university. There were hints such as differences

Read More

Scientists discover two new mammals in Australia

glidersbig

Australia’s three greater gliders (clockwise from top left) Petauroides minor, Petauroides volans, and Petauroides armillatus.


Denise McGregor and Jasmine Vink

Two new species of greater glider, a cat-size marsupial that lives in the forests of Australia, have been discovered Down Under after scientists ran DNA tests on new tissue samples of the animals. A new study published in Nature’s public access Scientific Reports journal details the findings. 

The discovery is significant because it means gliders are more diverse than previously thought, adding to the biodiversity of animals found in Australia. 

“It’s really exciting to find this biodiversity under our noses,” study researcher Kara Youngentob told The West Australian. “The division of the greater glider into multiple species reduces the previous widespread distribution of the original species, further increasing conservation concern for that animal and highlighting

Read More

Scientists discover human ancestor fossil tracks in South Africa



a close up of a rock


© Provided by Quartz


Around a hundred thousand years ago, South Africa’s Cape south coast was a busy place. Giraffes, crocodiles, hatchling sea turtles, and large bird species populated the landscape. Early humans were there, too.

We know all of this because of fossil track sites that today dot the Cape south coast, which is about 400 kilometers east of Cape Town. These sites date to between 400,000 years and 35,000 years ago, to a geological epoch known as the Pleistocene. The tracks were made on dunes and beaches, which became cemented over time. These ancient surfaces, which often preserve the tracks in remarkable detail, are now amenable to our inspection and interpretation. Our research team has been documenting these track sites since 2007.

A substantial body of archaeological evidence has accumulated, indicating that ancient humans on this coastline adorned themselves with jewelry, developed sophisticated tool technology, created some of

Read More