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The Genome of Your Pet Fish Is Extremely Weird

Humans have domesticated a large number of animals over their history, some for food, some as companions and protectors. A few species—think animals like rabbits and guinea pigs—have partly shifted between these two categories, currently serving as both food and pets. But one species has left its past as a food source behind entirely. And, in another rarity, it ended up serving not so much as a companion but as a decoration.

ARS TECHNICA

This story originally appeared on Ars Technica, a trusted source for technology news, tech policy analysis, reviews, and more. Ars is owned by WIRED’s parent company, Condé Nast.

We’re talking goldfish here, and we’ve now gotten a look at their genome. And it’s almost as weird as the fish themselves are.

It’s worth stopping for a moment to consider just how weird they are within the realm of domestication. They started out just as slightly colored

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Academies’ report reviews debate on genome editing for crop improvement

crop
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Since the ruling of the Court of Justice of the EU of 2018, which placed genome-edited crops under the Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) legislation, the scientific community has passionately debated the future of these new breeding techniques.


The new ALLEA report “Genome Editing for Crop Improvement” presents the state of the art of scientific evidence in the field and explores paths to harmonize EU legislation with recent scientific developments, while particularly considering relevant ethical and societal considerations.

The report summarizes the discussions between scientific experts, policy-makers and civil-society organizations at a public symposium Genome Editing for Crop Improvement held in Brussels in November 2019, where ALLEA and the Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium for Science and the Arts KVAB invited relevant stakeholders and the interested public to assess and discuss the impact of the ruling on present research and developments in genome editing for plant breeding.

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Cauliflower coral genome sequenced

Cauliflower coral genome sequenced
KAUST researchers compared populations of cauliflower corals to identify sites in the genome linked with adaptations. Credit: KAUST; Hagan Gegner

The sequencing of the genome of the cauliflower coral, Pocilloporaverrucosa, by an international team,provides a resource that scientists can use to study how corals have adapted to different environmental conditions.


The cauliflower coral, also known as brush or lace coral, is one of the most popular corals in research because it is found throughout the Red Sea, the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean. “Having the genome will help us understand the genetic basis underlying the species’ adaptation to different environmental conditions,” says Carol Buitrago-López, a Ph.D. student supervised by Christian R. Voolstra, “which might shine light on how corals could respond to global warming.”

Buitrago-López was seeking a sequenced cauliflower coral genome for use in population genomics studies of corals throughout the Red Sea. The habitat gradient in the

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Genome sequencing shows climate barrier to spread of Africanized bees

Genome sequencing shows climate barrier to spread of Africanized bees
A wild honeybee in Davis, California. European honeybees (Apis mellifera) were introduced to the Americas in the 1600s. Since 1957, “Africanized” honeybees (Apis mellifera scutellata) have interbred with other honeybees. New genomics research shows that climate forms a barrier to the spread of these scutellata genes to the north and south. Credit: Erin Calfee

Since the 1950s, “Africanized” honeybees have spread north and south across the Americas until apparently coming to a halt in California and northern Argentina. Now genome sequencing of hundreds of bees from the northern and southern limits shows a gradual decline in African ancestry across hundreds of miles, rather than an abrupt shift.


“There’s a gradual transition at the same latitude in North and South America,” said Erin Calfee, graduate student in the Department of Evolution and Ecology at the University of California, Davis, and first author on the paper, published Oct. 19 in PLOS Genetics

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UW Genome Sciences

Upcoming Events


Tuesday, May 19

Dissertation Defense: Nick Hasle
(Fowler Lab, Ph.D. in Genome Sciences)

“Using visual phenotypes to dissect sequence-function relationships and complex drug responses”

1:30 | flier | defense will be held remotely

Thursday, May 21

Dissertation Defense: Sarah Hilton
(Bloom Lab, Ph.D. in Genome Sciences)

“Modeling the effects of site-specific amino-acid preferences on protein evolution”

2:00 | defense will be held remotely

 

For a complete listing of GS events, please see the events calendar.





New Faculty


Genome Sciences is delighted that Dr. Alison Feder has accepted our offer to be an assistant professor and will join the department in 2021. Dr. Feder is currently a Miller Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley. She is a mathematical biologist who studies evolutionary forces that drive rapid adaptation, such as that seen in

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