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Career night for D.J. Stewart lifts Mississippi State over Texas State in Bulldogs’ home opener

STARKVILLE, Miss. – Three games into this basketball season, there is question as to whether or not Mississippi State can muster enough offense to find great success in the 2020-21 campaign. There is no question though that D.J. Stewart is a big piece of the Bulldogs’ puzzle and on Monday night in MSU’s home opener, the sophomore guard showed why. 

Stewart set a new career high as he scored 23 points to lead MSU to a 68-51 win over Texas State.

“D.J. Stewart was fantastic all night,” Mississippi State head coach Ben Howland said.

Outside of Stewart, only forward Tolu Smith reached double figures in scoring for the Bulldogs. Smith tallied 12. 

No matter though for MSU. Stewart was more than up for the challenge of putting the Bulldogs on his back. He shot 9-of-14 from the field overall, including a red-hot 5-of-6 showing from 3-point range.

Coming into the

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Are hospitals sending home more sick COVID patients? Yes, says Brown University expert

As hospitals fill up across the country, they’re sending home a higher percentage of patients to recover on their own, Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, writes on Twitter.



Dr. Ashish K. Jha wearing glasses and smiling at the camera: Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health


© The Providence Journal
Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health

“There is something funny happening with COVID hospitalizations,” Jha wrote in a multi-thread post late last night.

The percentage of COVID patients getting hospitalized is falling, he notes.

“My theory?” he writes. “As hospitals fill up, (the) bar for admission (is) rising. A patient who might have been admitted 4 weeks ago may get sent home now.”

The change doesn’t affect just COVID patients, but patients with other conditions, too, such as heart problems, or infections, Jha writes.

The pandemic has forced doctors to make difficult choices on who should be admitted and who should be sent home, Jha

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College basketball rankings: Losing to Richmond at home knocks Kentucky down in Top 25 And 1

John Calipari’s three best teams at Kentucky — the 2010 team, the 2012 team, and the 2015 team — were all built similarly. They were each led by a future No. 1 overall pick in the NBA Draft and supported by non-freshmen who spent multiple years in the program.

This year’s UK team isn’t built that way.

It is, instead, built with almost entirely new guys, none of whom project as a future No. 1 overall pick. And what history tells us about Calipari-coached teams built with almost entirely new guys, none of whom project as a future No. 1 overall pick, is that they usually, eventually, get really good or great but often experience ups and downs along the way. So what happened Sunday was an upset, sure. But there was nothing too surprising about these young Wildcats losing 76-64 inside Rupp Arena to an experienced Richmond team that

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How do you welcome home a college student amid COVID-19?

My daughter came home for the holidays. In response to COVID-19, her university had moved up the fall semester to ensure all classes and exams would end before Thanksgiving. That means we are now in winter break.

Were this a standard year, we would have celebrated her return by going out to dinner, perhaps to our favorite neighborhood sushi bar. Instead, the sushi bar was a non-starter, and my daughter marked her arrival by rapid testing for the coronavirus — the results came back negative — and retreating to her room to quarantine. After another negative test, we agreed that she could come out as long as everyone remained masked. After a third, the masks came down.

Those first days, though, when I had yet to spend any real time with her, my wife and I delivered meals and retrieved the dishes when she was done. We washed our hands.

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One college student shares why he trekked home for Thanksgiving, and what he’s doing to stay safe

College sophomore Elliot Boz arrived at his parent’s home in San Mateo, California, over the weekend with his bags in tow.



a group of people posing for the camera: Elliot Boz and his family.


© Courtesy Elliot Boz
Elliot Boz and his family.

Like many colleges across the country, his school — the University of Michigan — rewrote its academic calendar to end the in-person semester at Thanksgiving, due to the Covid-19 pandemic. That means Boz will remain home for the remainder of the year.

But just days before Thanksgiving, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued new guidance urging Americans not travel for the holiday.

That left Boz — and hundreds and thousands of other students nationwide — in a predicament: Leave as planned, despite CDC guidance, or stay even though the semester is over? And do the risks of potentially carrying Covid to their parents outweigh the benefits of reuniting with them?

For Boz, making the trek —

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Coronavirus home treatment program helps prevent hospitalizations at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics

IOWA CITY — While the health care system statewide grappled with a record number of coronavirus patients over the past several weeks, the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics’ “virtual hospital” program has helped alleviate some of the pressure, officials say.

The UIHC Home Treatment Team, which started early in the coronavirus pandemic, is a targeted initiative that provides daily direct care at home, in an effort to keep COVID-19 patients out of the hospital.

The team now has seen about 1,300 patients with high risk for complications of the virus. But to date, only 9 percent have required a hospital bed during their care. Only about 2 percent have required a bed in the intensive-care unit.

“I think that this program is something that’s helped keep our beds open to the best of our abilities,” said Dr. Andrew Bryant, clinical assistant professor of internal medicine and UI Health Care

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One college student shares why he trekked home for Thanksgiving, and what he’s doing to stay safe | Health

“Initially, they were really trying to … stay home,” he said. “Now they take a few more risks. But now with the spike, (in cases), I think they’re staying home and I’m pushing them to stay home as well.”

Even with Boz’s return, Thanksgiving — as expected — was not the same this year because of the pandemic.

The Boz family Thanksgiving traditionally includes Elliot, his parents, his 81-year-old grandparents (who live nearby), his older brother, Shura, and other family friends.

But Shura Boz, a college senior living in Los Angeles, opted not to trek to San Mateo for Thanksgiving this year. The Boz’s family friends are also no longer attending the gathering.

“My grandparents are really kind of the high risk factor in this situation,” Boz said. “How confident can we be that we’re not bringing home the virus or that we’re traveling safely? So in terms of my

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As COVID-19 cases soar, U.S. families weigh risks of welcoming college kids home

By Gabriella Borter



a sidewalk sign with a building in the background: FILE PHOTO: Women with protective face masks walk on the University of Michigan campus in Ann Arbor


© Reuters/SHANNON STAPLETON
FILE PHOTO: Women with protective face masks walk on the University of Michigan campus in Ann Arbor

(Reuters) – Nina Jain was regularly checking the nation’s COVID-19 data and holding out hope that her son Antonio, a sophomore who attends college in Iowa, could come home to Sacramento, California, for Thanksgiving this week.

Jain, who works in a government office, had her hopes dashed when she saw U.S. COVID-19 cases rise by an average of more than 168,000 per day last week. Antonio canceled his flight on Friday, hours before it was scheduled to depart, heeding public health warnings that a nationwide dispersal of college students heading home for the holidays could fuel a deadly wave of infections.



a young girl in a parking lot: FILE PHOTO: A woman wearing a protective face mask walks past a sorority house on the University of Michigan campus in Ann Arbor


© Reuters/SHANNON STAPLETON
FILE PHOTO: A woman wearing a protective face mask walks past a sorority house on the University of Michigan campus in Ann Arbor

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Should college students get a COVID-19 test before heading home for the holidays? | Momaha

Garcia, 19, said she is wary of travel and felt that completing her coursework at home, in a different time zone, would be too challenging. As a result, she plans to finish the quarter in Chicago and then fly home for the longer winter break because her parents want to see her and she misses the landscape of the Pacific Northwest.

Still, Garcia she said she’s nervous about traveling when the time comes, especially because her airline has started filling all of its seats instead of spacing out passengers. Though Garcia takes a COVID-19 test every week as required by U. of C., she said she might quarantine upon arriving home if the airport feels too crowded.

“If I didn’t absolutely have to be traveling I would not,” said Garcia, a classics and computer science major. “I would really rather not at all. I try not to go many places

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Home Office age rulings cost young refugees an education

When Shabaaz arrived in the UK from Afghanistan he was 13; a child in a strange country. “I was alone and I had no one to help me,” he says. Despite that, he had high hopes: he dreamed of going to university to study business.



a boat on a body of water: Photograph: Luke Dray/Getty


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Luke Dray/Getty

But there was a problem: social workers who assessed Shabaaz – not his real name – decided he was 16. And that, they said, meant he was too old to go to school and to study for GCSEs. “I was asking them to put me in a college or something like that, but they were saying they needed to sort out my age first,” he says. “They didn’t give me any education.”



a person riding on the back of a boat in a body of water: Asylum seekers landing on a Kent beach in September. May young people will miss out on school, college and university because of Home Office age assessments.


© Photograph: Luke Dray/Getty
Asylum seekers landing on a Kent beach in September. May young people will miss out on school, college and university because

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