Vacunacionadultos

Behind screens and in hospitals, South Korea students sit college exam amid coronavirus

SEOUL (Reuters) – Nearly half a million South Korean students took university entrance exams on Thursday, with COVID-19 students sitting in hospital and others separated by transparent screens.

South Korea is battling a third wave of coronavirus infections and authorities have taken strict steps to ensure all students can safely take the test, deemed a life-defining event for high school seniors to win a degree that could help land a good job.

Police and school officials guarded some 31,000 test venues across the country, which in normal years are usually filled with praying parents and cheering squads distributing hot drinks and snacks.

“It’s my second test, and I just wanted to get it done despite the risks of contracting the coronavirus. That’s all I was thinking about coming here,” Jeon Young-jin, 19, told Reuters in front of a test venue in Seoul.

Of the 491,000

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Key test: South Koreans sit university exam amid COVID-19 surge | South Korea

Nearly 500,000 high school students are sitting the test with stringent measures imposed to curb the virus.

South Korea fell quiet on Thursday as hundreds of thousands of students sat for the country’s high-stakes national university entrance exam amid a surge in coronavirus cases that has prompted new measures to curb its spread, including for candidates sitting the test.

Teenagers spend years preparing for the exam, which can mean a place in one of the elite colleges that are seen as key to future careers, incomes and even marriage prospects.

This year, the coronavirus pandemic has added to the pressure – delaying and disrupting the school year and at times forcing all classes online.

At the elite Ewha Girls’ Foreign Language High School many students arrived on their own or with their test-taking friends and some parents seemed more nervous than their children. Tightened curbs following a wave of new

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South Korea holds high-stakes college exam amid COVID-19

For eight hushed hours Thursday, a second-floor hospital room at the Mokpo City Medical Center at the southwestern tip of South Korea will be transformed into a test center — not for the coronavirus, but for admission to college.

Five hospital beds have been wheeled out, making way for a lone school desk. Nurses clad head-to-toe in white protective suits, goggles and masks will take turns serving as proctors. At the center of it all will be an 18-year-old high school senior with the coronavirus, taking the most important exam of her lifetime.

South Korea is forging ahead with its annual nationwide college entrance exam, despite unease over rising coronavirus infection rates. Nearly half a million students are set to take the test Thursday as the rest of the country grapples with a third wave of COVID-19 cases, with daily infections hovering around 500 in recent weeks.

In this hyper-competitive

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Students on Coronavirus Alert Ahead of University Entrance Exam – The Chosun Ilbo (English Edition): Daily News from Korea

Education authorities are on the alert as the daily number of new coronavirus cases spiked at 583 at midnight Wednesday, only a week before the university entrance exam.

High schools nationwide shut down again on Thursday and switched to online classes, and Education Ministry advised private crammers to close for a week.

But high school seniors are still worried about coronavirus infection from family members even if they stay home.

In a statement Thursday, Education Minister Yoo Eun-hae said that 70 percent of students who tested positive for coronavirus in November were infected by their own family.

According to the ministry, 21 high school seniors tested positive and 144 others were in self-quarantine as of Thursday. They will sit the exam in separate rooms, but the ministry only has 784 separate, and the total number of candidates who have at one time or another tested positive or self-isolated is 3,800.

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HKBU Global University Film Awards 2020 present Gold Award to entry from Korea National University of Arts

HONG KONG, Nov. 12, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Organised by the Academy of Film (AF) at Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU), the Global University Film Awards (GUFA) 2020 concluded on 6 November with the award presentation ceremony. The Gold Award went to the entry from the Korea National University of Arts in South Korea, while the Best Documentary prize went to the film entry from INSAS in Belgium. The full list of award winners is attached in the Appendix.

Attending the award presentation ceremony were Dr Clement Chen, Chairman of the Council and the Court of HKBU; Professor Roland Chin, President and Vice-Chancellor of HKBU; Professor Eva Man, Director of AF; Ms Chloe Suen, Chair of the Simon Suen Foundation; and Ms Shi Nan-sun, a film producer.

In his remarks, Dr Clement Chen said: “‘Make the Light, Move the World.’ So goes

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Kim Jong Un’s science policy improved industries, North Korea university says

Oct. 26 (UPI) — Kim Jong Un’s past pledge to bring improvements at North Korean farms and factories is being highlighted on the website of the regime’s top university.

Kim Il Sung University recently posted online a past statement from the North Korean leader calling for the widespread application of science and technology, South Korean news service NK Economy reported Monday.

The remarks from Kim were made in June 2013, when the leader visited a machine plant and met with a local official who directly requested technical documents that could go toward improving production, the university said. Kim agreed to the request, and the leader’s decision has been beneficial to other North Korean entities, according to the university.

“Today, in North Korea’s factories, enterprises and cooperative farms, science and technology dissemination offices are well established, demonstrating enormous vitality in the struggle for science and technology talent,” the North Korean statement

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Pandemic widens learning gap in education-obsessed South Korea

A teacher prepares lesson with a cell phone on the first day of online class in an empty classroom as South Koreans take measures to protect themselves against the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19) at Seoul Girls High School on April 09, 2020 in Seoul, South Korea.

Chung Sung-Jun | Getty Images

Students in South Korea like elsewhere are taking online classes off and on, studying from home during the coronavirus pandemic.

When South Korea began its delayed school year with remote learning in April, that spelled trouble for low-income students who rely on public education, get easily distracted and cannot afford cram schools or tutors used by many in this education-obsessed country.

Students like Han Shin Bi, who struggled to concentrate.

“Online classes were really inconvenient,” said Han, a high school senior in Seoul. “I ended up with a bad grade (in an exam) because I didn’t really focus on

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Pandemic widens learning gap in education-obsessed S. Korea

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — When South Korea began its delayed school year with remote learning in April, that spelled trouble for low-income students who rely on public education, get easily distracted and cannot afford cram schools or tutors used by many in this education-obsessed country.

Students like Han Shin Bi, who struggled to concentrate.

“Online classes were really inconvenient,” said Han, a high school senior in Seoul. “I ended up with a bad grade (in an exam) because I didn’t really focus on studying while online. It was a blow.”

Like legions of other students around the world, kids in South Korea are struggling with remote learning, taking online classes off-and-on from home as the nation battles the coronavirus pandemic.

Experts say the reduced interaction with teachers, digital distractions and technical difficulties are widening the education achievement gap among students in South Korea, leaving those less well off, like

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