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Underage Marine became one of World War II’s daring ‘Thieves’ of Saipan; he landed in Oregon after military career

The Marines wore sneakers.

They moved noiselessly through the jungle in their unconventional military footwear. They carried knives and rifles and dynamite, but they planned to use piano wire — the “Mafia necktie” — to kill.

The Marine Corps magazine The Leatherneck would call them “Tachovsky’s Terrors” in a December 1944 issue (their leader was Lt. Frank Tachovsky). But their fellow Marines in the 6th Regiment knew them as “The 40 Thieves” — a Marine platoon being about 40 men.

Herbert McBride, who settled in southern Oregon after hanging up his combat sneakers, was one of the Thieves. A Memphis native, he joined the Marines shortly after the Japanese attacked the United States at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. McBride offered up a fake birth certificate that put his age at 19. He’d actually just turned 15.

Frank Tachovsky

Frank Tachovsky, who led the “40 Thieves,” receives a Silver Star from

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The asteroid NASA just landed on turns out to be hollow, with a large ‘void’ at its center. It may be spinning itself to death.



A rotating mosaic of asteroid Bennu, composed of images captured by NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft over a four-hour period on December 2, 2018. NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona


© NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona
A rotating mosaic of asteroid Bennu, composed of images captured by NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft over a four-hour period on December 2, 2018. NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona

The asteroid Bennu just keeps getting more bizarre.

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When NASA decided to send a probe to land on a space rock and bring back samples, it picked Bennu for its seemingly smooth surface — perfect landing ground. But once the Osiris-Rex spacecraft had made the 200-million-mile journey to Bennu, the images it beamed back revealed a landscape covered in boulders and rock fields.

NASA eventually chose the flattest spot it could find to land, and the touch-and-go operation to scoop up material went smoothly last month. But then came the next surprise: Bennu’s rock turned out to be incredibly soft, crumbling under the spacecraft as it touched the surface.

The probe fired a blast of nitrogen to send rock

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