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How SpaceX and NASA’s Crew-1 mission should go, from launch to landing

  • SpaceX’s Crew-1 mission is set to launch from the Kennedy Space Center at 7:49 p.m. ET on Saturday, rocketing four astronauts into space.
  • It’s the first full-length mission NASA has contracted from Elon Musk’s company, and NASA’s first full-length commercial space mission overall.
  • Crew-1 will also be the longest-duration human spaceflight mission ever launched from US soil.
  • Here’s what to expect as SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spaceship flies to orbit and back.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

SpaceX is about to launch its most important NASA mission yet: On Saturday, Elon Musk’s rocket company is slated to send four astronauts to the International Space Station on its Crew Dragon spaceship.

Crew-1, as the flight is called, will be SpaceX’s first full-length mission for NASA. It’s also the company’s second time launching people and the longest-duration human space mission ever launched from US soil. The current record, 84 days, has

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SpaceX launches Space Force GPS satellite and sticks another landing

spacexspaceforceoct2020

SpaceX shared this earlier scenic view of the Falcon 9. 


SpaceX

A shiny new SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on Thursday successfully lofted the latest military satellite to space for the US Space Force.

Elon Musk’s rocket company finally launched the third-generation military GPS satellite after a series of earlier delays. It was initially set for blastoff in late September but then got pushed back a few days. It came close to lifting off Oct. 2, but the launch was aborted with just two seconds to go on the countdown clock.

The unexpected issue led to a few other delays, notably of NASA’s Crew-1 mission to send four astronauts to the International Space Station aboard a SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule, out of concern that the issue could crop up on other Merlin engines.

An investigation revealed

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SpaceX lofts Space Force GPS satellite and sticks another landing

SpaceX used a shiny new Falcon 9 rocket to successfully loft the latest military satellite to space for the US Space Force on Thursday.



a crane next to a body of water: SpaceX shared this earlier scenic view of the Falcon 9. SpaceX


© Provided by CNET
SpaceX shared this earlier scenic view of the Falcon 9. SpaceX

Elon Musk’s rocket company finally launched the third-generation military GPS satellite after a series of earlier delays. It was initially set for blastoff in late September but then got pushed back a few days. It came close to lifting off Oct. 2, but the launch was aborted with just two seconds to go on the countdown clock.

The unexpected issue led to a few other delays, notably of NASA’s Crew-1 mission to send four astronauts to the International Space Station aboard a SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule, out of concern that the issue could crop up on other Merlin engines.

An investigation revealed that a bit of “masking lacquer” had blocked a

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‘Like Froth on a Cappuccino’: Spacecraft’s Chaotic Landing Reveals Comet’s Softness

The chaotic crash-landing of a robotic spacecraft called Philae has yielded serendipitous insights into the softness of comets.

In 2014, the pioneering European Space Agency (ESA) lander touched down on comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, after a ten-year journey aboard its mothership, Rosetta. But rather than fix itself to the surface, Philae bounced twice and ended up on its side under a shady overhang, cutting its mission short.

After a meticulous search, an ESA team has now discovered the previously unknown site of Philae’s second touchdown—and with it an imprint that the craft left in comet ice that is billions of years old.

The imprint has allowed the researchers to measure the strength of ice beneath the comet’s surface—and they discovered that it is exceptionally soft. “It’s softer than the lightest snow, the froth on your cappuccino or even the bubbles in your bubble bath,” says Laurence O’Rourke, an ESA scientist at the

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NASA video shows Osiris-Rex probe landing on asteroid, kicking up dust

  • NASA’s Osiris-Rex spacecraft landed on an asteroid to suck up a sample of rock and dust on Tuesday.
  • New video footage shows the tricky operation, including the six seconds that it touched the asteroid’s surface and blew nitrogen gas to send up a flurry of alien rock.
  • Mission controllers must now determine if the spacecraft obtained enough sample to bring back to Earth.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

NASA landed a spacecraft on an asteroid 200 million miles away on Tuesday.

New footage shows its tricky six seconds of contact and the flurry of alien rock that the probe sent flying in order to suck up a sample.

The mission, called Osiris-Rex, aims to return a sample of the asteroid to Earth. But landing on the asteroid, called Bennu, was no small feat. The terrain turned out to be much rockier than researchers expected, with Bennu covered in

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Video Shows NASA Probe’s Quick Landing on Asteroid Bennu

When NASA’s OSIRIS-REX spacecraft touched the surface of an asteroid on Tuesday to gather a sample of rocks and dirt, the operation proceeded smoothly, to the glee of the mission’s operators 200 million miles away on Earth.

But the biggest question remained unanswered: How much of the asteroid did OSIRIS-REX pick up? Did it manage to gather any samples at all?

On Wednesday, the mission managers released a video of the sampling mechanism hitting the surface of the asteroid, within three feet or so of where the spacecraft had been aimed.

“I must have watched about a hundred times last night,” Dante Lauretta, the principal investigator of the mission, said during a news conference on Wednesday.

The sampling mechanism set down partly on a rock about 8 inches wide. That could have caused a problem if it had prevented the mechanism from pressing up against the surface.

“But literally, we

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Landing Coverage Set for NASA Astronaut Chris Cassidy, Space Station Crew

Landing Coverage Set for NASA Astronaut Chris Cassidy, Space Station Crew

PR Newswire

WASHINGTON, Oct. 15, 2020

WASHINGTON, Oct. 15, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — NASA will provide live coverage of the return to Earth for agency astronaut Chris Cassidy and two Russian cosmonauts Wednesday, Oct. 21, after six months aboard the International Space Station. Complete coverage of the return will be available on NASA TV and the agency’s website.

NASA Logo. (PRNewsFoto/NASA) (PRNewsFoto/) (PRNewsfoto/NASA)
NASA Logo. (PRNewsFoto/NASA) (PRNewsFoto/) (PRNewsfoto/NASA)

Cassidy, the Expedition 63 commander, and cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner of Roscosmos, will close the hatch to their Soyuz MS-16 spacecraft at 4:10 p.m. EDT Wednesday. Their Soyuz will undock at 7:32 p.m. from the Poisk module’s space-facing port. A parachute-assisted landing is set for 10:55 p.m. EDT (8:55 a.m. Oct. 22 Kazakhstan time) southeast of the remote town of Dzhezkazgan on the steppe of Kazakhstan.

NASA TV coverage of

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NASA Live Streams First Ever Asteroid Landing Of OSIRIS-REx On Bennu

KEY POINTS

  • OSIRIS-REx will collect samples from asteroid Bennu on Oct. 20, at 6:12 p.m. EDT
  • NASA will provide a live stream of the historic feat on their website
  • Viewers can ask questions to mission experts by tweeting #ToBennuAndBack

NASA announced Thursday its live stream of OSIRIS-REx’s mission as it ventures from orbit departure to sample collection on the asteroid Benu.

The Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer mission, better known as OSIRIS-REx, is set to collect samples of an asteroid named Bennu on Oct. 20, at 6:12 p.m. EDT. NASA is keen to share the intimate moments of the mission with the public, releasing an article on Oct. 15 about its live stream and the activities it has planned for the day itself.

Live coverage of the spacecraft’s descent toward the asteroid’s surface, as well as its “Touch-and-Go” maneuver, will be provided by NASA Television and its website

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