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The Long-Term Impact Our Boss Has On Our Career

That luck plays a significant part in our career is increasingly evident. For instance, research from Harvard has shown that we’re judged more harshly for failing under the most extreme of circumstances than we are by succeeding in the most benign.

Indeed, research from the University of Catania suggests that luck is often more influential than talent in the accumulation of wealth. Indeed, talent was found to be one of the least important factors. Which perhaps makes a study from the University of Colorado at Boulder seem quite sensible when it shows that it’s logical to pay lucky CEOs more than unlucky ones. As Napolean was famously believed to have said, it’s better to have a lucky general than a good one.

Generous bosses

New research from the University of Rochester reveals that luck can have a similarly enduring effect

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Long-term research shows ocean acidification ramping up on the Great Barrier Reef

The future is now: Long-term research shows ocean acidification ramping up on the Great Barrier Reef
A healthy coral community near Palm Island, central Great Barrier Reef. Credit: Australian Institute of Marine Science

Ocean acidification is no longer a somber forecast for the Great Barrier Reef but a present-day reality, a new study reveals.


The study, published in Scientific Reports, shows carbon dioxide (CO2) and ocean acidification are rapidly increasing on the Reef. Seawater CO2 has risen 6 percent over the past 10 years and matches the rate of CO2 increases in the atmosphere, confirming the influence of atmospheric CO2 on seawater CO2 levels.

“People talk about ocean acidification in terms of 50 years’ time, but for the first time our study shows how fast ocean acidification is already happening on the Reef,” said Dr. Katharina Fabricius, lead author and Senior Principal Research Scientist at the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS).

The research, a collaboration between AIMS and

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Mourinho confident Son will commit long-term career to Tottenham

(Reuters) – Tottenham Hotspur manager Jose Mourinho believes Son Heung-min has proven his credentials as a world class player over the last few seasons at the north London club and the South Korean forward will be rewarded with a new contract “sooner or later”.



Heung-Min Son holding a football ball: Premier League - Tottenham Hotspur v Everton


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Premier League – Tottenham Hotspur v Everton

Son came on as a substitute to score for the ninth time in all competitions this season as Spurs claimed a convincing 3-0 win over LASK Linz in the Europa League on Thursday.

When asked what Son needs to do to become a world class player, Mourinho told reporters: “It is up to you – he cannot do more than what he does.

“Season after season after season Sonny is showing how good he is. Of course, the better the team is the easier it is for the players to emerge.”

Son is under contract at

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Long-term data show a recent acceleration in chemical and physical changes in the ocean

Long-term data show a recent acceleration in chemical and physical changes in the ocean
From L to R: Rod Johnson (BATS Co-PI), Emily Davey (Research Technician), Dom Smith (Research Technician) and Claire Medley (Research Technician) sample the CTD for dissolved O2 and CO2 aboard the R/V Atlantic Explorer during a routine Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) cruise. Credit: Ella Cedarhold, Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences

New research published in Nature Communications Earth & Environment uses data from two sustained open-ocean hydrographic stations in the North Atlantic Ocean near Bermuda to demonstrate recent changes in ocean physics and chemistry since the 1980s. The study shows decadal variability and recent acceleration of surface warming, salinification, deoxygenation, and changes in carbon dioxide (CO2)-carbonate chemistry that drives ocean acidification.


The study utilized datasets from Hydrostation ‘S’ and the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) projects at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS). Both are led by Professor Nicholas Bates, BIOS senior scientist and the

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