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The shortest event ever timed has been measured in zeptoseconds

The time it takes for a single particle of light to pass through a hydrogen molecule is now the shortest duration ever measured.

This interval was about 247 zeptoseconds, or trillionths of a billionth of a second, researchers report in the Oct. 16 Science. For comparison, there are as many zeptoseconds in one second as there are seconds in 2,500 times the age of the universe, which is about 13.8 billion years old. The new observation has allowed physicists to witness light-matter interactions at a whole new level of detail.

The physicists shined particles of X-ray light on hydrogen molecules in a gas. As each light particle, or photon, crossed an H2 molecule, it booted an electron from one hydrogen atom, then the other. Because electrons can exhibit wavelike behavior (SN: 5/3/19), the two ejection events stirred up electron waves that spread out and merged —

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Atmosphere In Hot Neptune Exoplanet Measured For The First Time [Video]

KEY POINTS

  • Hot Neptune LTT 9779b was first discovered in 2019
  • Exoplante’s temperature is over 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit 
  • Its atmosphere is fundamentally different from other previously studied exoplanets

The atmosphere of exoplanet Hot Neptune LTT 9779b can melt lead, platinum, chromium and stainless steel, according to a new study. The exoplanet does not have a solid surface and is much hotter than Mercury. 

Hot Neptune LTT 9779b was also found to have carbon monoxide in its atmosphere. Compared to Earth, a year on this exoplanet is less than 24 hours because of its extremely rapid revolution around its star. Additionally, the exoplanet has a permanent dayside that does not cool down, hence, it has very little heat to its night side. 

The new study, published in Astrophysical Journal Letters, concluded that Hot Neptune is emitting a spectrum that is fundamentally different from other previously studied exoplanets, such as the “Hot

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Scientists just measured the smallest amount of time ever observed: 247 ‘zeptoseconds’

Blink and you’ll definitely miss it.

Scientists have measured the shortest interval of time ever recorded, clocking how long it takes a particle of light to cross a single molecule of hydrogen.

The ultra-quick journey took 247 zeptoseconds, according to a team of German researchers, with a zeptosecond representing a trillionth of a billionth of a second. This is equivalent to the number 1 written behind a decimal point and 20 zeroes.

The findings are the culmination of global efforts to measure shorter and shorter time spans in physics, and they offer scientists a way to precisely measure atomic changes through what’s known as the photoelectric effect.

Albert Einstein proposed a theory of the photoelectric effect in 1905, describing the phenomenon in which electrons can be ejected from atoms after they are hit by light. In 1999, an Egyptian chemist, Ahmed Zewail, used ultrashort laser pulses to observe how molecules

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Meet the zeptosecond, the shortest unit of time ever measured



background pattern: A particle of light, called a photon (yellow arrow), produces electron waves out of an electron cloud (grey) of a hydrogen molecule (red: nucleus). The result of those interactions is what’s called an interference pattern (violet-white). The interference pattern is slightly skewed to the right, allowing researchers to calculate the time for the photon to get from one atom to the next.


© Provided by Live Science
A particle of light, called a photon (yellow arrow), produces electron waves out of an electron cloud (grey) of a hydrogen molecule (red: nucleus). The result of those interactions is what’s called an interference pattern (violet-white). The interference pattern is slightly skewed to the right, allowing researchers to calculate the time for the photon to get from one atom to the next.

Scientists have measured the shortest unit of time ever: the time it takes a light particle to cross a hydrogen molecule. 

That time, for the record, is 247 zeptoseconds. A zeptosecond is a trillionth of a billionth of a second, or a decimal point followed by 21 zeroes and a 1. Previously, researchers had dipped into the realm of zeptoseconds; in 2016, researchers reporting in the journal Nature Physics used lasers to measure time in increments down to 850 zeptoseconds. This accuracy is

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