Vacunacionadultos

Oxford and Cambridge battle it out on University Challenge in VERY tense match

University Challenge viewers enjoy ‘boat race’ nail-biter with Oxford and Cambridge neck-and-neck on points with minutes to go during battle for a quarter-final spot

  • As this series edges ever close to the final stage, the matches are hotting up
  • Latest contest saw St John’s Cambridge take on Balliol Oxford in boat race battle
  • Host Jeremy Paxman told Balliol they’d ‘got in under the wire’ after a late flourish 
  • A question about flightless birds saw Oxford finally gain the momentum to win 
  • The show is currently being screened with new social distancing rules in force, with perspex panels and ear pieces introduced for contestants 

It’s getting to the business end of the University Challenge deal and the weekly contests are getting ever more tense, as the latest match – between St John’s Cambridge

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Hindu fury as Oxford University college offers Haribo Goldbears at a dinner to celebrate Diwali

Hindu fury as Oxford University college offers Haribo Goldbears sweets at a dinner to celebrate Diwali – even though they contain beef

  • Oxford college says sorry for offering Haribo Goldbears sweets at a Diwali dinner
  • Christ Church admitted the choice of sweet had not been ‘properly scrutinised’ 
  • Beef consumption conflicts with the Hindu faith as cows are considered sacred

It was the sugary treat that left a rather sour taste. One of Oxford University’s most prestigious colleges has apologised for offering Haribo Goldbears sweets at a dinner to celebrate the Hindu festival of Diwali – even though they contain beef.

The consumption of beef conflicts with the Hindu faith as cows are considered sacred, and angry students took to social media to criticise the blunder at Christ Church.

Writing

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Anti-vaxxers exploit confusion over Oxford University data



a man standing in front of water: MailOnline logo


© Provided by Daily Mail
MailOnline logo

Anti-vaccine campaigners are exploiting confusion over Oxford researchers’ data to cast doubts on their jab’s safety.

Experts fear substantial numbers will refuse the vaccine.

One study predicted only around half of British adults will agree to be vaccinated, severely hitting the ability of the programme to generate herd immunity.

These fears have grown as anti-vaccination campaigners have jumped on criticism of the way the preliminary data from Oxford’s trials has been handled.

The Oxford team said on Monday that, overall, the trial suggested the vaccine gave 70 per cent protection – but an initial lower dose for the first of the two jabs required would raise that protection to 90 per cent.



a group of people standing in front of water: An anti-vax demonstrator talks to police while carrying a large syringe near the headquarters of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in London


© Provided by Daily Mail
An anti-vax demonstrator talks to police while carrying a large syringe near the headquarters of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in London

However, officials in

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Anti-vaxxers exploit confusion over Oxford University data to cast doubts on jab’s safety

Anti-vaccine mob are exploiting confusion over Oxford University researchers’ data to cast doubts on the AstraZeneca jab’s safety

Anti-vaccine campaigners are exploiting confusion over Oxford researchers’ data to cast doubts on their jab’s safety.

Experts fear substantial numbers will refuse the vaccine.

One study predicted only around half of British adults will agree to be vaccinated, severely hitting the ability of the programme to generate herd immunity.

These fears have grown as anti-vaccination campaigners have jumped on criticism of the way the preliminary data from Oxford’s trials has been handled.

The Oxford team said on Monday that, overall, the trial suggested the vaccine gave 70 per cent protection – but an initial lower dose for the first of the two jabs required would raise that protection to 90

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Coronavirus: Oxford University and AstraZeneca vaccine to be assessed by regulator

A coronavirus vaccine rollout in the UK could be a step closer after the regulator was formally asked by the Government to assess the Oxford University and AstraZeneca jab.

The move “marks a significant first step in getting the vaccine approved for deployment” if it meets safety, efficacy and quality standards, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said.

It comes a week after the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) was formally asked by the Government to assess the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said: “We are working tirelessly to be in the best possible position to deploy a vaccine as soon as one is approved by the independent regulator the MHRA.

READ MORE: Latest Covid vaccine signals ‘clear light at the end of the tunnel’

“We have formally asked the regulator to assess the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine, to understand the data and determine whether it meets

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Covid-19 vaccine: UK asks regulator to assess AstraZeneca and Oxford University vaccine amid questions

The British government on Friday said it has formally asked the country’s medicines regulator to assess whether a coronavirus vaccine developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University should be authorised for use.

The step comes amid questions about preliminary results from AstraZeneca and Oxford University trials of the jab, after the company and the university acknowledged that the most encouraging part of their findings stemmed from a dosing error.

UK Health Secretary Matt Hancock said he had asked the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) to determine whether the vaccine “meets rigorous safety standards.”

It’s the second vaccine candidate to reach the formal assessment stage in Britain, following a shot developed by Pfizer and its  German partner BioNTech. A third vaccine from US firm Moderna is not far behind.

The British government has ordered 100 million doses of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, and plans to start distributing it in December if

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Regulator formally asked to assess Oxford University and AstraZeneca vaccine

A coronavirus vaccine rollout in the UK could be a step closer after the regulator was formally asked by the Government to assess the Oxford University and AstraZeneca jab.

The move “marks a significant first step in getting the vaccine approved for deployment” if it meets safety, efficacy and quality standards, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said.



It comes a week after the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) was formally asked by the Government to assess the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said: “We are working tirelessly to be in the best possible position to deploy a vaccine as soon as one is approved by the independent regulator the MHRA.

(PA Graphics)
(PA Graphics)

“We have formally asked the regulator to assess the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine, to understand the data and determine whether it meets rigorous safety standards.”

British scientists have defended Oxford University and AstraZeneca after

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Scrutiny grows over Oxford University/AstraZeneca vaccine

The Oxford University/AstraZeneca vaccine is coming under increasing scrutiny, with critics questioning the claim that trials showed it could protect up to 90% of people against coronavirus.



Menelas N. Pangalos et al. posing for the camera: Photograph: House of Commons/PA


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: House of Commons/PA

On Thursday Sir John Bell, Oxford’s regius professor of medicine and the UK government’s life sciences adviser, dismissed suggestions the trial had not been properly set up or reported. “We weren’t cooking this up as we went along,” he said, adding that he hoped the full, peer-reviewed data would be published in the Lancet medical journal at the weekend.

In spite of the public excitement generated by the announcement that a third vaccine had been successful – with particular promise for developing countries as it is relatively cheap and can be stored at fridge temperature – AstraZeneca’s share price dropped.

One analyst in the US wrote in an investor note that “we believe that

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Oxford University’s COVID-19 vaccine shows high efficacy, and is cheaper to make and easier to store

Oxford University’s COVID-19 vaccine, being developed in partnership with drugmaker AstraZeneca, has shown to be 70.4% effective in preliminary results from its Phase 3 clinical trial. That rate actually includes data from two different approaches to dosing, including one where two full strength does were applied, which was 62% effective, and a much more promising dosage trial which used one half-dose and one full strength dose to follow – that one was 90% effective.

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Oxford’s results may not have the eye-catching high efficacy headline totals of the recent announcements from Pfizer and Moderna, but they could actually represent some of the most promising yet for a few different reasons. First, if that second dosage strategy holds true across later results and further analysis, it means that the Oxford vaccine can be administered in lower amounts and provide stronger efficacy (there’s no reason to use the full two-dose method

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AstraZeneca and Oxford University’s vaccine is effective at preventing COVID-19, trial results suggest. Here’s everything we know so far.



Screen grab taken from video issued by Britain's Oxford University, showing a person being injected as part of the first human trials in the UK to test a potential coronavirus vaccine, untaken by Oxford University in England, Thursday April 23, 2020 Oxford University Pool via AP


© Oxford University Pool via AP
Screen grab taken from video issued by Britain’s Oxford University, showing a person being injected as part of the first human trials in the UK to test a potential coronavirus vaccine, untaken by Oxford University in England, Thursday April 23, 2020 Oxford University Pool via AP

  • On Monday, AstraZeneca and The University of Oxford released results for their large-scale trial, which showed their COVID-19 vaccine was 70% effective. 
  • The Oxford vaccine is administered in two doses at least one month apart, similar to both Pfizer’s and Moderna’s vaccines. 
  • The vaccine is being sold far cheaper than the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, too — in part because AstraZeneca has pledged to make no profit from the vaccine, and to sell it at cost to developing nations on an ongoing basis. 
  • The European Medicines Agency (EMA), the regulatory body for Europe, has already started evaluating lab
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