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Drexel University to open research center on racism and health

Drexel University’s Dornsife School of Public Health announced plans Thursday to launch a center to further research on racial inequity and disparities in health.



a group of people standing on a sidewalk: Ana Diez Roux (left), dean of Drexel's School of Public Health, greets David and Dana Dornsife in 2018. The school was named after the couple in honor of their donation. Dana Dornsife, who grew up in Yardley, is a 1983 graduate.


© ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/The Philadelphia Inquirer/TNS
Ana Diez Roux (left), dean of Drexel’s School of Public Health, greets David and Dana Dornsife in 2018. The school was named after the couple in honor of their donation. Dana Dornsife, who grew up in Yardley, is a 1983 graduate.

Established with a $9 million gift from philanthropist and alumna Dana Dornsife and her husband, David, the Center on Racism and Health will aim to advance anti-racist public health research and train students and professionals to combat racism in public health.

“All over the world there are renewed calls to address racism as the public health crisis that it is,” said Ana Diez Roux, dean of the Dornsife School, said in a news release. “The Dornsife School has

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Darden School of Business and Boston University Release Research on Word-of-Machine Effect: Why People Prefer AI Recommenders to Human Ones

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va., Dec. 1, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — In an article in the Journal of Marketing—based on data from over 3,000 people who took part in 10 experiments—and in a follow-up article in Harvard Business Review, Chiara Longoni (Boston University) and Luca Cian (Darden School of Business) provide evidence supporting what they call a word-of-machine effect: the circumstances in which people prefer AI recommenders to human ones.

More and more companies are leveraging technological advances in AI, machine learning, and natural language processing to provide relevant and in-the-moment recommendations to consumers. As these companies evaluate using AI-based assistance, there is one critical question that must be asked: When do consumers trust the “word of machine,” and when do they resist it? 

The word-of-machine effect stems from a (false) lay belief for which people believe that AI systems are more competent than humans in dispensing advice when functional

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$62-Million Applied Science Hub Opens for Research on Concordia University’s Loyola Campus

‘A major nexus of transdisciplinary collaboration’: University leaders and elected officials celebrate new era of research at Concordia’s new Applied Science Hub

Concordia University’s Applied Science Hub was officially opened today on the university’s Loyola Campus, in the Montreal neighbourhood of Notre-Dame-de-Grâce.

The $62-million state-of-the-art facility — built thanks to $52.75 million in support from the Government of Canada and the Government of Quebec — was strategically designed to enable interdisciplinary collaboration and research between faculty and students in the Faculty of Arts and Science, Gina Cody School of Engineering and Computer Science as well as the District 3 Innovation Centre.

The virtual opening ceremony included remarks from both William Amos, Parliamentary Secretary for the Government of Canada’s Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry and Danielle McCann, Minister of Higher Education for the Government of Quebec.

Please click here to download a high resolution image of the Applied Science Hub.

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$11M NIH grant will fund biomedical research at University of Delaware

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IMAGE: University of Delaware Professor Joe Fox (top right) leads the Center of Biomedical Research Excellence that has won a second phase of funding from the NIH. Newly added to the…
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Credit: Composite image by Jeffrey C. Chase

Biomedical research at the University of Delaware has fresh fuel for the next five years, as the National Institutes of Health has renewed a Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) grant for a second phase, worth more than $11 million.

This COBRE grant is focused on Discovery of Chemical Probes and Therapeutic Leads and is led by Joseph Fox, professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

The work of this team of scientists is focused on discovery of new molecules that can be used to study and treat diseases such as breast cancer, renal cancer, Crohn’s disease, tuberculosis and Legionnaires disease.

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Gain Therapeutics and University of Maryland School of Medicine Announce Research Collaboration

BETHESDA, Md. and BALTIMORE, Nov. 30, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Gain Therapeutics, Inc. (“Gain”), today announced a research collaboration with the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), to investigate Gain’s structurally targeted allosteric regulators (STARs) in cellular models of neuronopathic Gaucher disease (nGD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). STARs are proprietary small molecules targeting novel allosteric binding sites on enzymes. These small molecule drug candidates are designed to cross the blood brain barrier and penetrate other hard to treat organs such as bone and cartilage, stabilize the effective enzyme to restore function and reduce toxic substrate. Research will be led by Ricardo A. Feldman, Ph.D., Associate Professor, of Microbiology and Immunology in UMSOM.

Under the terms of the collaboration, UMSOM will investigate Gain’s STAR candidates in macrophage and neuronal models of nGD and GBA -associated PD. These diseases are characterized by mutations in the GBA gene, where misfolding of the

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Waste Milk Could Be Used to Reduce Power Plant CO2 Emissions, Says Clarkson University Research

Clarkson University research is featured on the front cover of the November issue of Advanced Sustainable Systems. The stylized cover artwork (above) features a North Country landmark, the surge tank of a Raquette River hydroelectric plant in nearby Hannawa Falls, where both of the paper’s authors reside. (Photo credit: J. Pokrzywinski, D. Aulakh, W. Verdegaal, V.H. Pham, H. Bilan, S. Marble, D. Mitlin, M. Wriedt: “Dry and Wet CO2 Capture from Milk-Derived Microporous Carbons with Tuned Hydrophobicity.” Advanced Sustainable Systems. 2020. Volume 4. Issue 11. Pages 207022. Copyright Wiley-VCH GmbH. Reproduced with permission.)

Clarkson University research is featured on the front cover of the November issue of Advanced Sustainable Systems. The stylized cover artwork (above) features a North Country landmark, the surge tank of a Raquette River hydroelectric plant in nearby Hannawa Falls, where both of the paper’s authors reside. (Photo credit: J. Pokrzywinski, D. Aulakh, W. Verdegaal, V.H. Pham,

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Waste Milk Could Be Used to Reduce Power Plant CO2 Emissions, Says Clarkson University Research | Money

This is the first report of state-of-the-art performance for an activated carbon derived from a natural compound. The process for making the sorbents is similar to what is done to roast coffee, but with a secondary agent that etches nanoscale holes onto the material.

“Think of extremely dark roast holey coffee beans,” says co-author University of Texas at Austin and former Clarkson Professor David Mitlin. “The nanoscale holes, because of their strict sizes and surface chemistry, are very effective in trapping CO2 while keeping out water vapor. The CO2 is trapped reversibly in the carbon sorbent’s micropores, which can be reused once the CO2 is released from its pores.”

Wriedt notes that the dairy product used in the process would not be taken from the food supply.

He says that although milk consumption has declined more than 30 percent since 1980, there has been a 13 percent increase in annual

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London’s dirty air increases risk of catching Covid-19, Queen Mary University research finds

Vehicle pollution appears to increase the risk of contracting Covid-19, London scientists have discovered.

Researchers took PM10 particulates captured in Marylebone Road and tested them on laboratory-grown human nose and throat cells.

They found that these airborne pollutants increased the body’s susceptibility to contracting the virus.

Professor Jonathan Grigg, lead researcher at Queen Mary University of London, said the early findings showed the importance of ongoing measures to clean up the capital’s air.

He said the nose was the “front door” through which the virus entered the body – and that pollutants could effectively widen the door by making the cells more of a target for covid.

This is because toxins increase the amount of an enzyme known as ACE2 on the surface of the cells in the nose and lower throat, making them more receptive to covid, probably for a “short-term period”.

Prof Grigg told the Standard: “Most people

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Test developed by University of Minnesota research could help hemp farmers keep crops legal

On top of all the other risks Minnesota farmers face from planting to harvest, those growing industrial hemp deal with an unusual one: If the crops produce too much THC, the psychoactive substance present in all cannabis plants, then it’s not hemp under state and federal laws, but marijuana.

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It can be very difficult for growers to know exactly how much THC their hemp seeds are going to produce, so farmers can plant seeds thinking they are growing a legal and environmentally friendly crop, only to find out they’ve actually invested time and money in growing a drug.

All of it, then, must be destroyed.

To combat that uncertainty and risk, researchers at the University of Minnesota recently developed a genetic test that will take out some of the guesswork.

The research, published last month in the American Journal of Botany, compared the genes of different varieties of

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Shanghai Normal University Establishes Digital Humanities Research Center to Promote Chinese DH Research and Education – Press Release

On November 23, 2020, the International Summit Forum on Digital Humanities and the Opening Ceremony of Digital Humanities Research Center of Shanghai Normal University (SHNUDH) was held in Xuhui campus of Shanghai Normal University. Dozens of experts and scholars from Harvard, UCL, Academia Sinica, PKU and other well-known universities, research and cultural institutions were invited to attend the meeting.

 

After a brief and warm opening ceremony, the scholars conducted in-depth exchanges on giving full play to the advantages of Humanities in the digital age, responding to the major concerns of the times and society, and enabling the humanities and social sciences to combine the latest progress in the frontier fields of digital technology, methods and artificial intelligence, and realizing the deep integration and collaborative innovation of science and technology and humanities and social sciences. Scholars also discussed on their research theories and methods, history and current situation, development direction of

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