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Miami University’s towering landmark to come down

A 63-year-old landmark visible throughout the Miami University campus will soon be coming down.



a large tall tower with a forest in the background: A 63-year-old landmark on the Oxford campus of Miami University is coming down soon. The Williams Hall Transmission Tower, which is visible for miles around the campus, is being dismantled. The 342-foot-tower once broadcast Miami's public TV and radio programing. (Provided PhotoJournal-News)


© Connor Moriarty
A 63-year-old landmark on the Oxford campus of Miami University is coming down soon. The Williams Hall Transmission Tower, which is visible for miles around the campus, is being dismantled. The 342-foot-tower once broadcast Miami’s public TV and radio programing. (Provided PhotoJournal-News)

The Williams Hall Transmission Tower, once used for both Miami radio and television broadcasts from the school’s Oxford campus, will be dismantled later this month, said school officials.

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The 342-feet-tall tower has been highest and most visible structure on the school’s campus since 1957.

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But it’s long outlived its usefulness, said Cody Powell, associate vice president for facilities planning and operations for Miami.

“It’s been part of the campus for a very long time,” said Powell,

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She began planting the tower garden, which she purchased with a grant from the Education Foundation for Billings Public Schools. Rainbow chard, kale, and basil are growing this year.  

For elementary students, especially the youngest, concepts like nutrition can be difficult to truly understand. It’s not just about memorizing facts; it requires a more nuanced understanding of long-term consequences of actions and understanding of how food is created. 

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With gardening, Olson’s students learn how vegetables grow and what can affect that; they move plants into and out of sunlight, water them less and more, and try different varieties.

“You have to be patient and try some things,” Olson said. 



Kerra Olson

Boulder Elementary first grade teacher Kerra Olson talks with her students as they take a look at a hydroponic garden where the class has been growing and harvesting food.


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