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Miami University’s towering landmark to come down

A 63-year-old landmark visible throughout the Miami University campus will soon be coming down.



a large tall tower with a forest in the background: A 63-year-old landmark on the Oxford campus of Miami University is coming down soon. The Williams Hall Transmission Tower, which is visible for miles around the campus, is being dismantled. The 342-foot-tower once broadcast Miami's public TV and radio programing. (Provided PhotoJournal-News)


© Connor Moriarty
A 63-year-old landmark on the Oxford campus of Miami University is coming down soon. The Williams Hall Transmission Tower, which is visible for miles around the campus, is being dismantled. The 342-foot-tower once broadcast Miami’s public TV and radio programing. (Provided PhotoJournal-News)

The Williams Hall Transmission Tower, once used for both Miami radio and television broadcasts from the school’s Oxford campus, will be dismantled later this month, said school officials.

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The 342-feet-tall tower has been highest and most visible structure on the school’s campus since 1957.

Miami students leave for longer break during pandemic, won’t return until late January

But it’s long outlived its usefulness, said Cody Powell, associate vice president for facilities planning and operations for Miami.

“It’s been part of the campus for a very long time,” said Powell,

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Auditor-General releases ‘scathing’ report into Auckland University’s $5m house purchase



a house with trees in the background: The house was the most expensive on the shortlist of three.


© RNZ/Checkpoint
The house was the most expensive on the shortlist of three.

The University of Auckland has been slammed by the Auditor-General for the controversial purchase of a $5 million house for its Vice-Chancellor.

The university bought the house in the inner-city suburb of Parnell as a home for incoming vice-chancellor Dawn Freshwater in November 2019, and would also be used for “business-related operations, and functions”.

The purchase of the four-bedroom, 338 square metres property was criticised as “absolutely disgusting” by NZ Union of Student Associations president Isabella Lenihan-Ikin, who compared it to the houses students are known to rent.

“I think there’s a difference between buying a house for Vice-Chancellor and buying $5 million mansions,” she told Checkpoint.

The Auditor General’s office launched an investigation into the “unusual purchase”, the results of which were released in a report on Wednesday.

It

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$62-Million Applied Science Hub Opens for Research on Concordia University’s Loyola Campus

‘A major nexus of transdisciplinary collaboration’: University leaders and elected officials celebrate new era of research at Concordia’s new Applied Science Hub

Concordia University’s Applied Science Hub was officially opened today on the university’s Loyola Campus, in the Montreal neighbourhood of Notre-Dame-de-Grâce.

The $62-million state-of-the-art facility — built thanks to $52.75 million in support from the Government of Canada and the Government of Quebec — was strategically designed to enable interdisciplinary collaboration and research between faculty and students in the Faculty of Arts and Science, Gina Cody School of Engineering and Computer Science as well as the District 3 Innovation Centre.

The virtual opening ceremony included remarks from both William Amos, Parliamentary Secretary for the Government of Canada’s Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry and Danielle McCann, Minister of Higher Education for the Government of Quebec.

Please click here to download a high resolution image of the Applied Science Hub.

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Ashford University’s 2020 Teaching and Learning Conference Examines Critical Issues in Online Higher Education

Throughout the conference, participants joined three keynote addresses, four featured speakers, six panel discussions, and 120 presenters representing 14 institutions to create actionable ideas that explore the value of traditional liberal arts versus career-focused curricula. These discussions were guided with this question in mind: “Must education in the 21st century take an either/or approach to what will prepare students to be ethical and productive contributors to society?”

TLC’s keynote speakers encouraged conference attendees to consider this question with creativity, empathy, and purpose throughout the discussions and panels. Keynote speaker Larry Robertson, award-winning author, strategist, and innovation advisor at Lighthouse Consulting, opened the conference by offering a framework for resiliency through creative experimentation during challenging times in higher education. During his keynote address, Dr. Craig Swenson, President of Ashford University, encouraged conference attendees to consider how education helps to preserve democracy throughout our nation’s evolution. Dr. Warren

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Miami University’s board of trustees approves two new degrees in nursing


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The board of trustees approved plans to move forward with an addition to the stables located at Miami for the equestrian program. (Architectural rendering.)

Two new degree programs in nursing at Miami University were approved by the board of trustees at its regular business meeting held Monday, Nov. 30.

A Masters of Science in Nursing and a Doctor of Nursing Practice will add 50 new courses within the College of Liberal Arts and Applied Science at the regional campuses. The master’s program includes three areas of study concentrations: nurse practitioner, nurse leadership and nurse educator. The doctor of nursing will provide coursework to prepare nurses for advanced leadership and patient care.

These are two of the newest emerging and in-demand degrees that Miami is launching to meet changing workforce needs. This year the university rolled out plans for 14 new undergraduate degrees, 12 graduate offerings, and 20 certificates and micro-credentials.

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McGill University’s redesigned MBA program equips students to lead in shifting business climate

“As the COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated, what works today will not always work tomorrow,” said Professor John-Paul Ferguson, Academic Director of the MBA program. “At the Desautels Faculty of Management, we are in close communication with industry leaders who are searching for candidates to help them build more resilient, future-ready companies. Our newly designed MBA program gives students the right blend of skills and experience to answer the call.”

Traditionally, most MBA students relied on their degree to reach the next level within their company or industry. Today, an increasing number of students enroll in the MBA program to change industry, relaunch their career in another country, or prepare to start their own business. “Our redesigned MBA responds to changing student needs as well as to market demand,” said Ferguson. “The average MBA student has changed significantly in the past 15 to 20 years.” The Faculty’s one- or two-year

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Oxford University’s COVID-19 vaccine shows high efficacy, and is cheaper to make and easier to store

Oxford University’s COVID-19 vaccine, being developed in partnership with drugmaker AstraZeneca, has shown to be 70.4% effective in preliminary results from its Phase 3 clinical trial. That rate actually includes data from two different approaches to dosing, including one where two full strength does were applied, which was 62% effective, and a much more promising dosage trial which used one half-dose and one full strength dose to follow – that one was 90% effective.

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Oxford’s results may not have the eye-catching high efficacy headline totals of the recent announcements from Pfizer and Moderna, but they could actually represent some of the most promising yet for a few different reasons. First, if that second dosage strategy holds true across later results and further analysis, it means that the Oxford vaccine can be administered in lower amounts and provide stronger efficacy (there’s no reason to use the full two-dose method

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AstraZeneca and Oxford University’s vaccine is effective at preventing COVID-19, trial results suggest. Here’s everything we know so far.



Screen grab taken from video issued by Britain's Oxford University, showing a person being injected as part of the first human trials in the UK to test a potential coronavirus vaccine, untaken by Oxford University in England, Thursday April 23, 2020 Oxford University Pool via AP


© Oxford University Pool via AP
Screen grab taken from video issued by Britain’s Oxford University, showing a person being injected as part of the first human trials in the UK to test a potential coronavirus vaccine, untaken by Oxford University in England, Thursday April 23, 2020 Oxford University Pool via AP

  • On Monday, AstraZeneca and The University of Oxford released results for their large-scale trial, which showed their COVID-19 vaccine was 70% effective. 
  • The Oxford vaccine is administered in two doses at least one month apart, similar to both Pfizer’s and Moderna’s vaccines. 
  • The vaccine is being sold far cheaper than the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, too — in part because AstraZeneca has pledged to make no profit from the vaccine, and to sell it at cost to developing nations on an ongoing basis. 
  • The European Medicines Agency (EMA), the regulatory body for Europe, has already started evaluating lab
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16-Year-Old Emory Pruitt Becomes Clark Atlanta University’s Youngest Student

A teen from Tennessee has made history by becoming the youngest student to be accepted to Clark Atlanta University when she was just 15 years old.

The university announced that Emory Pruitt, who hails from Hendersonville, TN, has enrolled as a student at the university for fall 2020, making her one of the youngest students in the HBCU’s history and the youngest one in recent memory.

The young woman graduated from her high school early with a 3.7 GPA. Yet, her path to college was marked by challenges. Pruitt said adversity and racism in her hometown high school didn’t deter her from chasing her dream. “It actually was the dedication and my family that pushed me each day,” said Pruitt, who is now 16. “I should thank the people that doubted me; that just made me work even harder.”

Emory’s mother, Karen Pruitt, had enrolled her daughter in online classes

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Oxford University’s coronavirus vaccine shows 70% protection

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Vaccines: What are they and how can they help fight Covid-19?

A coronavirus vaccine developed by the University of Oxford in the UK stops 70% of people developing symptoms of the disease.

Other vaccines by companies such as Pfizer and Moderna showed 95% protection.

However, the Oxford jab developed with company AstraZeneca is a lot cheaper and is easier to store, meaning it can be transported all over the world.

The Oxford researchers have performed a large scale trial, where more than 20,000 volunteers, half in the UK, the rest in Brazil have taken the medicine to test how safe and effective it is.

Researchers found that the effectiveness of the jab rose to 90% in a group of volunteers who were given a half dose

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