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U.K. Asks Regulator to Assess AstraZeneca-Oxford Vaccine

LONDON — The British government said Friday it has formally asked the country’s medicines regulator to assess whether a coronavirus vaccine developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University should be authorized for use.

The step comes amid questions about preliminary results from trials of the jab, after the company and the university acknowledged that the most encouraging part of their findings stemmed from a dosing error.

U.K. Health Secretary Matt Hancock said he had asked the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency to determine whether the vaccine “meets rigorous safety standards.”

It’s the second vaccine candidate to reach the formal assessment stage in Britain, following a shot developed by Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech. A third vaccine from U.S. firm Moderna is not far behind.

The British government has ordered 100 million doses of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, and plans to start distributing it in December if it gains approval.

The

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Coronavirus: Oxford University and AstraZeneca vaccine to be assessed by regulator

A coronavirus vaccine rollout in the UK could be a step closer after the regulator was formally asked by the Government to assess the Oxford University and AstraZeneca jab.

The move “marks a significant first step in getting the vaccine approved for deployment” if it meets safety, efficacy and quality standards, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said.

It comes a week after the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) was formally asked by the Government to assess the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said: “We are working tirelessly to be in the best possible position to deploy a vaccine as soon as one is approved by the independent regulator the MHRA.

READ MORE: Latest Covid vaccine signals ‘clear light at the end of the tunnel’

“We have formally asked the regulator to assess the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine, to understand the data and determine whether it meets

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Covid-19 vaccine: UK asks regulator to assess AstraZeneca and Oxford University vaccine amid questions

The British government on Friday said it has formally asked the country’s medicines regulator to assess whether a coronavirus vaccine developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University should be authorised for use.

The step comes amid questions about preliminary results from AstraZeneca and Oxford University trials of the jab, after the company and the university acknowledged that the most encouraging part of their findings stemmed from a dosing error.

UK Health Secretary Matt Hancock said he had asked the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) to determine whether the vaccine “meets rigorous safety standards.”

It’s the second vaccine candidate to reach the formal assessment stage in Britain, following a shot developed by Pfizer and its  German partner BioNTech. A third vaccine from US firm Moderna is not far behind.

The British government has ordered 100 million doses of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, and plans to start distributing it in December if

Read More

Regulator formally asked to assess Oxford University and AstraZeneca vaccine

A coronavirus vaccine rollout in the UK could be a step closer after the regulator was formally asked by the Government to assess the Oxford University and AstraZeneca jab.

The move “marks a significant first step in getting the vaccine approved for deployment” if it meets safety, efficacy and quality standards, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said.



It comes a week after the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) was formally asked by the Government to assess the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said: “We are working tirelessly to be in the best possible position to deploy a vaccine as soon as one is approved by the independent regulator the MHRA.

(PA Graphics)
(PA Graphics)

“We have formally asked the regulator to assess the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine, to understand the data and determine whether it meets rigorous safety standards.”

British scientists have defended Oxford University and AstraZeneca after

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Scrutiny grows over Oxford University/AstraZeneca vaccine

The Oxford University/AstraZeneca vaccine is coming under increasing scrutiny, with critics questioning the claim that trials showed it could protect up to 90% of people against coronavirus.



Menelas N. Pangalos et al. posing for the camera: Photograph: House of Commons/PA


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: House of Commons/PA

On Thursday Sir John Bell, Oxford’s regius professor of medicine and the UK government’s life sciences adviser, dismissed suggestions the trial had not been properly set up or reported. “We weren’t cooking this up as we went along,” he said, adding that he hoped the full, peer-reviewed data would be published in the Lancet medical journal at the weekend.

In spite of the public excitement generated by the announcement that a third vaccine had been successful – with particular promise for developing countries as it is relatively cheap and can be stored at fridge temperature – AstraZeneca’s share price dropped.

One analyst in the US wrote in an investor note that “we believe that

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Oxford University’s COVID-19 vaccine shows high efficacy, and is cheaper to make and easier to store

Oxford University’s COVID-19 vaccine, being developed in partnership with drugmaker AstraZeneca, has shown to be 70.4% effective in preliminary results from its Phase 3 clinical trial. That rate actually includes data from two different approaches to dosing, including one where two full strength does were applied, which was 62% effective, and a much more promising dosage trial which used one half-dose and one full strength dose to follow – that one was 90% effective.

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Oxford’s results may not have the eye-catching high efficacy headline totals of the recent announcements from Pfizer and Moderna, but they could actually represent some of the most promising yet for a few different reasons. First, if that second dosage strategy holds true across later results and further analysis, it means that the Oxford vaccine can be administered in lower amounts and provide stronger efficacy (there’s no reason to use the full two-dose method

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AstraZeneca and Oxford University’s vaccine is effective at preventing COVID-19, trial results suggest. Here’s everything we know so far.



Screen grab taken from video issued by Britain's Oxford University, showing a person being injected as part of the first human trials in the UK to test a potential coronavirus vaccine, untaken by Oxford University in England, Thursday April 23, 2020 Oxford University Pool via AP


© Oxford University Pool via AP
Screen grab taken from video issued by Britain’s Oxford University, showing a person being injected as part of the first human trials in the UK to test a potential coronavirus vaccine, untaken by Oxford University in England, Thursday April 23, 2020 Oxford University Pool via AP

  • On Monday, AstraZeneca and The University of Oxford released results for their large-scale trial, which showed their COVID-19 vaccine was 70% effective. 
  • The Oxford vaccine is administered in two doses at least one month apart, similar to both Pfizer’s and Moderna’s vaccines. 
  • The vaccine is being sold far cheaper than the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, too — in part because AstraZeneca has pledged to make no profit from the vaccine, and to sell it at cost to developing nations on an ongoing basis. 
  • The European Medicines Agency (EMA), the regulatory body for Europe, has already started evaluating lab
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Dosing ERROR at AstraZeneca-Oxford University vaccine trial led to huge boost in jab’s success rate

Dosing ERROR by researchers at the AstraZeneca-Oxford University vaccine trial led to huge boost in jab’s success rate, firm’s vice-president reveals

  • AstraZeneca scientist Mene Pangalos says ‘serendipity,’ led to a break through 
  • ‘Mistake’ helped scientists discover half-dose was more effective than a full one 
  • More analysis needed to explain why an initial lower dose was more effective

A dosing error by researchers on the AstraZeneca-Oxford University vaccine trial led to a huge boost in the jab’s success rate, the firm’s vice president has revealed.

Mene Pangalos, head of AstraZeneca’s non-oncology research and development, said: ‘The reason we had the half dose is serendipity.’

Volunteers in Britain were expected to receive two full doses of the vaccine as it was trialed in the hope of funding a cure.

Dr Pangalos says researches were

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AstraZeneca, Oxford COVID-19 vaccine: What you need to know

  • On Monday, AstraZeneca and The University of Oxford released results for their large-scale trial, which showed their COVID-19 vaccine was 70% effective. 
  • The Oxford vaccine is administered in two doses at least one month apart, similar to both Pfizer’s and Moderna’s vaccines. 
  • The vaccine is being sold far cheaper than the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, too — in part because AstraZeneca has pledged to make no profit from the vaccine, and to sell it at cost to developing nations on an ongoing basis. 
  • The European Medicines Agency (EMA), the regulatory body for Europe, has already started evaluating lab data produced by AstraZeneca and The University of Oxford vaccine as part of a “rolling review,” which could make approval faster.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

AstraZeneca and The University of Oxford announced Monday that large-scale trial results showed that their COVID-19 vaccine is 70% effective.

The results follow months

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Scientists hail Oxford University vaccine breakthrough

Watch: Oxford COVID vaccine ‘up to 90% effective’



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a blurry photo of a forest


© Yahoo News UK


Scientists have hailed the news of the latest successful trial of a coronavirus vaccine, saying they “can see the end of the tunnel”.

The results of a large-scale trial of the COVID-19 vaccine developed by the University of Oxford and manufacturer AstraZeneca has been welcomed by health experts and the government.

England’s chief medical officer, Professor Chris Whitty, tweeted that it was a “very encouraging step forward”.

Overall, the vaccine was revealed to be 70% effective against coronavirus. However, it can be up to 90%

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